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Language of Literary Success


09 May 2019

Gungahlin Teacher Publishes Short Stories

Gungahlin College teacher and Aurealis Awards shortlisted novella author Angela Rega with the recently published anthology Aurum. (Photo: Brenton Sloane)
Gungahlin College teacher and Aurealis Awards shortlisted novella author Angela Rega with the recently published anthology Aurum. (Photo: Brenton Sloane).

When Gungahlin College languages teacher Angela Rega started writing short stories more than 10 years ago, they were for her eyes only – she never imagined she would get national attention for them.

But with 25 short stories now published nationally and internationally and her work shortlisted for multiple awards, she can’t escape the attention.

“I always wanted to write, but when I wrote [the stories] were just for me,” Angela said. “It is wonderful to have been recognised – I still kind of can’t believe it.”

Angela’s novella With This Needle I Thee Thread was this year shortlisted for Best Horror Novella in the prestigious national Aurealis Awards. The Aurealis Awards seek to recognise the achievements of Australian science fiction, fantasy and horror writers.

With This Needle I Thee Thread, which was published in the anthology Aurum, has also been shortlisted for the Norma K Hemming Award. This award focuses on excellence in the exploration of themes of race, gender, sexuality, class or disability in Australian speculative fiction works.

Angela also channels her literary enthusiasm into a Gungahlin College student creative writing group.

“I like to share the love of writing with the students, and I regularly bring authors into the school to talk to them. The kids love having the authors in,” Angela said.

“We alternate weekly between creative writing classes and a reading café. The kids doing it are happy to grow and develop their writing.”

The group has already seen its first publication success, with one student having had a ‘flash fiction’ story published in AntipodeanSF magazine.

“It’s exciting to see students completing short stories and getting them published,” Angela said. “It’s a really great outcome.”

Angela slots her writing in between her teaching duties and her creative writing group – but she’s showing no signs of slowing down.

Her Nielma Sidney Short Story Prize runner-up story Paper boats will be published in June and she will continue working with her creative writing group.

There is also a ‘fairytale’ novel in the pipeline – but details are still under wraps for now.

Angela said that she hopes her story and her work at Gungahlin College encourages students to express themselves through writing.

“Creative writing is fun and rewarding. I’d encourage everyone to give it a try.”