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The Directorate launched the Strategic Plan 2014-17: Education Capital: Leading the Nation in October 2013. The Strategic Plan guides the organisation and informs its clients and stakeholders about key priorities of the Directorate. The Plan identifies five priority areas for the four-year period:

Performance against these priorities in the reporting period is discussed in this section.

1. Quality Learning

We will ensure all learners have access to powerful and relevant learning experiences.

Quality learning is the core element of the Directorate's service provision. It can be measured through the performance of students in national and international assessments.

Figure B2.1 shows that the mean achievement score of year 5 students in reading in the National Assessment Program - Literacy and Numeracy (NAPLAN) increased from 505 in 2009 to 515 in 2013, close to the target of 516 for 2013. The average performance of ACT students was well above that of Australian students over the last five years and above the target in 2012.

Figure B2.1: Mean achievement score of all year 5 public school students in reading in NAPLAN, 2009 to 2013

Graph showing mean achievement score of all year 5 public school students in reading in NAPLAN, 2009-2013

Source: Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority, National Assessment Program – Literacy and Numeracy 2009 to 2013.

NAPLAN is conducted in all states and territories in May each year. Students in years 3, 5, 7 and 9 are tested in reading, language conventions, numeracy and writing.

More detailed information regarding NAPLAN can be found at http://nap.edu.au.

Literacy performance of year 9 students was also strong, with an increase in the mean achievement score in reading by five points, from 587 in 2009 to 592 in 2013 (Figure B2.2). There was some room for improvement in year 9 reading to achieve the target, however the gap closed between 2012 and 2013. Compared with national trends, the ACT performed very well in reading. ACT year 9 students outperformed Australian students by achieving higher mean scores in NAPLAN assessments from 2009 to 2013.

Figure B2.2: Mean achievement score of all year 9 public school students in reading in NAPLAN, 2009 to 2013

Graph showing mean achievement score of all year 9 public school students in reading in NAPLAN, 2009-2013

Source: Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority, National Assessment Program – Literacy and Numeracy 2009 to 2013.

The performance of ACT public school students in years 5 and 9 in numeracy was stable over the last five years.

All year 5 students in the ACT had the highest mean scale score in numeracy along with Victoria and New South Wales in 2013. Year 5 students in public schools achieved the target in 2012. The mean score was slightly below the target for 2013 but well above the mean score for all Australian students (Figure B2.3).

The trend of ACT year 5 students performing above Australian students in numeracy from 2009 to 2013 was also well established.

Figure B2.3: Mean achievement score of all year 5 public school students in numeracy in NAPLAN, 2009 to 2013.

Graph showing mean achievement score of all year 5 public school studentsGraph showing mean achievement score of all year 5 public school students in numeracy in NAPLAN, 2009-2013 in numeracy in NAPLAN, 2009-2013

Source: Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority, National Assessment Program – Literacy and Numeracy, 2009 to 2013

The results for all ACT year 9 students were also the highest in the nation, along with Victoria, New South Wales and Western Australia. The ACT had the equal highest proportion of year 9 (with NSW) students in the top two performance bands in numeracy in 2013. Mean scores of year 9 students in ACT public schools showed a declining trend but were still above Australian students' mean scores from 2009 to 2013 (Figure B2.4).

Figure B2.4: Mean achievement score of all year 9 public school students in numeracy in NAPLAN, 2009 to 2013

Graph showing mean achievement score of all year 9 public school students in numeracy in NAPLAN, 2009-2013

Source: Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority, National Assessment Program – Literacy and Numeracy, 2009 to 2013.

ACT students performed well in the international Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA). Average scores of ACT students were above those of students in other jurisdictions in 2012. PISA assessed students' competencies in three core domains (reading, numeracy and science), with the focus on mathematical literacy in 2012.

In mathematical literacy, the ACT average score was significantly above the OECD average. The ACT ranked 10th (Figure B2.5) when compared to all countries, equivalent to the average performance of students in a group of countries including the Netherlands, Canada and Austria. Sixty-four percent of ACT students performed at or above level three (nationally agreed proficiency standard) on the mathematical literacy scale, compared with 59 percent for Australia.

Figure B2.5: PISA mathematical literacy mean score, 2012

Graph showing PISA mathematical literacy mean score, 2012

Source: Australian Council for Educational Research, PISA 2012: How Australia Measures Up

In reading literacy, the average performance of students in the ACT was statistically similar to students in Western Australia and Victoria, and significantly above students in all other jurisdictions. The ACT performance in reading literacy ranked sixth when compared with all countries, equivalent to Finland and Ireland.

In scientific literacy, the ACT average was significantly higher than the Australian average, and statistically similar to the performances of Western Australia and New South Wales.

Over time, results in mathematics in PISA for both ACT and Australian students have been falling. In mathematical literacy, results for ACT students fell from 548 in 2003 to 518 in 2012. This trend of declining results was seen in all Australian states and territories and many western countries around the world, including Finland and Canada. By contrast, results in Asian countries, including Korea and Hong Kong, showed improvement over the same period (Figure B2.6).

Figure B2.6: PISA mathematical literacy mean scores, 2003 to 2012

Graph showing PISA mathematical literacy mean scores, 2003 to 2012

Source: Australian Council for Educational Research, various PISA reports: How Australia Measures Up

The Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) is conducted on a three-year cycle, assessing students aged 15 years in reading, mathematical and science literacy. It is conducted worldwide by the Organisation of Economic Cooperation and Development.

Further information regarding PISA can be found at: http://www.oecd.org/pisa/keyfindings/pisa-2012-results.htm.

ACT year 6 students performed the best in the nation in the 2012 National Assessment Program - Science Literacy (NAP Science). The ACT maintained its number one position in 2012, similar to the previous three assessments in 2003, 2006 and 2009 (Figure B2.7).

NAP Science is a triennial assessment which tests year 6 students' scientific literacy and inquiry skills. The ACT had the highest proportion of boys (67%) and girls (64%) performing at or above the proficient standard. This compared with the national results of 52 percent for boys and 51 percent for girls. The proficient standard is a challenging level of performance with students demonstrating a high level of scientific inquiry skills.

Despite a marginal decline in results from 2003 to 2009, the ACT mean score rose in 2012.  (Figure B2.7).

Figure B2.7: Mean scores of ACT and Australian year 6 students in science literacy, 2003 to 2012

Graph showing mean scores of ACT and Australian year 6 students in science literacy, 2003-2012

Source: National Assessment Program - Science Literacy Year 6 Reports, 2006 and 2012

The NAP Science is a national sample assessment of primary students' science literacy skills. It assesses students' understanding of science, natural phenomena and scientific issues to make sense of the world. Students in year 6 in a sample of schools across Australia take part.

Further information on the assessment is available from the NAP website: http://www.nap.edu.au/nap-sample-assessments/science-literacy/napsa-science-literacy.html.

The performance of ACT students in vocational education and training was stable over the last five years (Figure B2.8). From 2009 to 2013, at least 60 percent of all year 12 students in public schools achieved a nationally recognised vocational qualification. A smaller percentage (between 52% and 60%) of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students received a nationally recognised vocational qualification between 2009 and 2012. In 2013, however, 71 percent of year 12 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students in public schools received a nationally recognised vocational qualification, surpassing the achievement of all students (60%).

Figure B2.8: Percentage of year 12 students who received a nationally recognised vocational qualification, 2009 to 2013

Graph showing percentage of year 12 students who received a nationally recognised vocational qualification, 2009 to2013

Source: Education and Training Directorate

The percentage of year 12 students receiving a nationally recognised vocational qualification is the number of year 12 students who completed year 12 and achieved a vocational qualification, or equivalent, divided by the total number of students enrolled in year 12 as at February census. Data is obtained from the Board of Senior Secondary Studies and the Directorate's School Census undertaken in February.

Further information on this measure can be obtained by emailing to ETDAnnualReport@act.gov.au.

The quality of vocational education and training in the ACT was rated highly by apprentices undertaking Australian Apprenticeships. Over the five year period from 2009 to 2013, apprentices reported around 80 percent satisfaction with their apprenticeship (Figure B2.9). Satisfaction levels for ACT students were slightly below satisfaction levels for all apprentices in Australia.

Figure B2.9: Percentage of apprentices satisfied with their training under Australian Apprenticeships, 2009 to 2013

Graph showing percentage of apprentices satisfied with their training under Australian Apprenticeships, 2009 to 2013

Source: National Centre for Vocational Education Research, Student Outcomes Survey

Apprentices satisfied with their training is obtained from the annual Student Outcomes Survey of the National Centre for Vocational Education Research. The annual survey seeks to measure apprentices' and vocational education and training students' satisfaction with training and post-training employment outcomes.

Further information on this measure can be obtained by emailing to ETDAnnualReport@act.gov.au.

Participation in vocational education and training by students from disadvantaged backgrounds increased. Participation by students with a disability increased slightly (1.1%) from 2008 to 2012. There was a 75.5 percent increase in the participation rate of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students (Figure B2.10).

The participation rate of students with a disability in the ACT was similar to that for Australia. For Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students, the ACT participation rate exceeded the Australian rate for 2011 and 2012.

Vocational education and training participation rates are calculated by dividing the population aged 15 to 64 by the number of students engaged in vocational education and training.

Further information this measure can be obtained by emailing to ETDAnnualReport@act.gov.au.

Figure B2.10: Participation in vocational education and training by student type, ACT and Australia, 2008 to 2012

Graph showing participation in vocational education and training by student type, ACT and Australia, 2008 to 2012

Source: Productivity Commission, National Agreement for Skills and Workforce Development, National Agreement Performance Information, 2011 and 2012

2. Inspirational Teaching and Leadership

We will build the capacities of our teachers and leaders - by design, not by chance.

Quality learning flows from inspirational teaching and school leadership. In 2014 the Directorate employed 3,479 teachers and 770 school leaders.

The average number of years of employment in the Directorate steadily increased from 8.4 years in 2009-10 to 8.8 years in 2013-14 (Figure B2.11). The average length of employment was a sign of a staff friendly organisational environment and flexible work-life balance employment arrangements.

Figure B2.11: Average number of years of employment with the Directorate, 2009-10 to 2013-14

Graph showing average number of years of employment with the Directorate, 2009-10 to 2013-14

Source: Education and Training Directorate

Average number of years of employment of employment is the total number of years of employment of all employees divided by the total number of employees of the Directorate, based on the headcount of all permanent school and office-based staff in all classification streams as at the last pay day in the financial year. Staff on long service leave are excluded from these counts.

Further information on this measure can be obtained by emailing to ETDAnnualReport@act.gov.au.

In the last four years, an increasing proportion of teachers in public schools employed the use of learning technologies as part of their teaching practice. Figure B2.12 shows the proportion of teachers using technologies in classroom increased from 79.0 percent in 2010 to 82.6 percent in 2013.

Figure B2.12: Proportion of teachers using learning technologies, 2010 to 2013

Graph showing proportion of teachers using learning technologies, 2010 to 2013

Source: Education and Training Directorate, satisfaction Surveys 2010 to 2013

The proportion of teachers using learning technologies is based on a survey of teachers in ACT public schools conducted in August each year. In determining the proportion, the question 'The use of learning technologies is an integral part of learning and teaching in my classroom' is used. Responses are collected on a five point scale with only statements of 'agree' or 'strongly agree' used to calculate the result.

Further information on this measure can be obtained by emailing to ETDAnnualReport@act.gov.au.

The percentage of school teachers and leaders encouraging and practicing innovation in their teaching practice increased from 79.0 percent in 2010 to 84.7 percent in 2013 (Figure B2.13).

Figure B2.13: Proportion of teachers and school leaders modelling innovative practice, 2010 to 2013

Graph showing proportion of teachers and school leaders modelling innovative practice, 2010 to 2013

Source: Education and Training Directorate, Satisfaction Surveys 2010 to 2013

The proportion of teachers and school leaders modelling innovative practice is based on a survey of teachers in ACT public schools conducted in August each year. In determining the proportion, the question 'Innovative practice is encouraged' is used. Responses are collected on a five point scale with only statements of 'agree' or 'strongly agree' used to calculate the result.

Further information on this measure can be obtained by emailing to ETDAnnualReport@act.gov.au.

A high performing school system encourages the development of leadership capacities of school teachers and leaders for the continuation of quality learning and teaching.

The proportion of public school teachers and leaders who reported participation in decision-making opportunities rose from 75.0 percent in 2010 to 78.9 percent in 2013.

Figure B2.14: Proportion of teachers and school leaders participating in decision-making, 2010 to 2013

Graph showing proportion of teachers and school leaders participating in decision-making, 2010 to 2013

Source: ACT Education and Training Directorate, Satisfaction Surveys 2010 to 2013

The proportion of teachers and school leaders participating in decision-making is based on a survey of teachers in ACT public schools conducted in August each year. In determining the proportion, the question 'I have opportunities to participate in decision-making' is used. Responses are collected on a five point scale with only statements of 'agree' or 'strongly agree' used to calculate the result.

Further information on this measure can be obtained by emailing to ETDAnnualReport@act.gov.au.

The ACT Public Service is committed to more than doubling the number of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander employees by 2015. The number of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander employees was around 40 during 2009-10 to 2011-12, before rising to 57 in 2012-13 (Figure B2.15). There was a 12.3 percent increase in the number of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander employees from 2012-13 (57 employees) to 2013-14 (64 employees).

Figure B2.15: Number of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander employees, 2009-10 to 2013-14

Graph showing number of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander employees, 2009-10 to 2013-14

Source: Education and Training Directorate

The number of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander employees is based on the headcount of employees identifying themselves as Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people as at the last payday in the financial year.

Further information on this measure can be obtained by emailing to ETDAnnualReport@act.gov.au.

3. High Expectations, High Performance

We have high expectations for all and will meet the learning needs of every student.

From 2009 to 2012, overall student satisfaction (across primary, high and college sectors) with the quality of the education received at public schools remained stable around 80 percent, with a slight drop from 2012 to 2013 (Figure B2.16). There were changes in the administration and content of the survey in 2013, in order to ensure consistency with the national approach, which may have impacted on the slightly lower result.

Figure B2.16: Overall student satisfaction with education at public schools, 2009 to 2013

Graph showing overall student satisfaction with education at public schools, 2009 to 2013

Source: Education and Training Directorate, Satisfaction Surveys, 2009 to 2013

Student satisfaction is based on a survey of students from years 5 to 12 in ACT public schools, excluding students at specialist schools, conducted in August each year. In determining overall student satisfaction, the question 'Overall I am satisfied I am getting a good education at this school' is used. Responses are collected on a five point scale with only statements of 'agree' or 'strongly agree' used to calculate overall satisfaction rates.

Further information on this measure can be obtained by emailing to ETDAnnualReport@act.gov.au.

The ACT public school certification rate for year 12 was 88.7 percent in 2013, an improvement from 88.0 percent in 2009 as shown in Figure B2.17.

Figure B2.17: Percentage of year 12 public school students who received a Year 12 Certificate, 2009 to 2013

Graph showing percentage of year 12 public school students who received a Year 12 Certificate, 2009 to 2013

Source: Education and Training Directorate

Year 12 certification is the number of students who meet the requirements of a Year 12 Certificate, expressed as a percentage of year 12 enrolments. Data is obtained from the Board of Senior Secondary Studies and the Directorate's School Census undertaken in February. Estimates are calculated based on the number of students completing the requirements of the ACT Year 12 Certificate divided by the number of year 12 students as at the ACT School Census.

Further information on this measure can be obtained by emailing to ETDAnnualReport@act.gov.au.

The certification rate for year 12 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students in public schools increased from 80.0 percent in 2009 to 86.2 percent in 2012, and then dropped to 70.9 percent in 2013 (Figure B2.18). In 2013 there were 55 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students enrolled in year 12 in ACT public colleges. Of these, 39 students graduated with a Year 12 Certificate, falling short of the target of 44 students (80%). The Directorate has a number of programs in place to continue to improve results for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students completing year 12 studies.

Figure B2.18: Percentage of year 12 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander public school students who received a Year 12 Certificate, 2009 to 2013

Graph showing perecentage of year 12 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander public school students who received a Year 12 Certificate, 2009 to 2013

Source: Education and Training Directorate

As shown in Figure B2.19, the percentage of year 12 public school graduates engaged in study or employment increased from 90.5 percent in 2009 to 91.7 percent in 2013. There was a slight fall in results in 2013.

The percentage of ACT graduates engaged in further study or employment remained substantially higher than the Australian percentage from 2009 to 2012.

Figure B2.19: Percentage of public school year 12 graduates studying or employed six months after completing year 12, 2009 to 2013

Graph showing percentage of public school year 12 graduates studying or employed six months after completing year 12, 2009 to 2013

Sources: Education and Training Directorate - Where are they now; and Productivity Commission, Report on Government Services (RoGS) 2011 to 2014.

ACT destination data are based on a survey of graduates who successfully complete an ACT year 12 certificate. Graduates from the previous year are surveyed in May of the reference year. The survey frame is drawn from the ACT Board of Senior Secondary Studies administrative records.

The Australian rate is for 15-24 year-olds engaged in full-time study or employment in May of the reference year after finishing year 12 the previous year.

Further information on this measure can be obtained by emailing to ETDAnnualReport@act.gov.au.

Over the five year period from 2009 to 2013, the proportion of graduates with improved employment status after training declined slightly, however remained well above the national results (Figure B2.20).

Figure B2.20: Proportion of graduates with improved employment status after training, 2009 to 2013

Graph showing proportion of graduates with improved employment status after training, 2009 to 2013

Source: National Centre for Vocational Education Research, Student Outcomes Survey 2013

Proportion of graduates with improved employment status is defined as graduates aged 20-64 years with an improved employment status after training divided by the total graduates aged 20-64 years. The data are derived from the annual Student Outcomes Survey of the National Centre for Vocational Education Research. The annual survey seeks to measure apprentices' and vocational education and training students' satisfaction with training and post-training employment outcomes.

Further information on this measure can be obtained from www.ncver.edu.au.

The apparent retention rate for all students from year 7 to 12 was 99.5 percent in 2009 and increased to 104.4 percent in 2013 (Figure B.21).  The higher than 100 percent result was due to enrolments of NSW students in public schools.

The apparent retention rate for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students from year 7 to 12 was 71.4 percent in 2009 however decreased to 65.2 percent in 2013 (Figure B2.21).

Figure B2.21: Apparent retention rate from year 7 to year 12, public school students, ACT and Australia, 2009 to 2013

Graph showing apparent retention rate from year 7 to year 12, public school students, ACT and Australia, 2009 to 2013

Source: Australian Bureau of Statistics Schools, Australia 2013

The apparent retention rate is an indicative measure of the number of students who have stayed in school, as at a designated year level. It is the percentage of the respective cohort group that those students would be expected to have come from assuming an expected progression of one grade per year.

Further information on this measure can be obtained from www.abs.gov.au.

The mean scores in reading and numeracy for NAPLAN Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander year 5 students in public schools improved from 2009 to 2013. The reading mean score increased by 30 score points (Figures B2.22). Mean scores of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students were subject to large variation due to a relatively small number of students undertaking the assessments in the ACT. The performance of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander year 5 students in the ACT was significantly higher than that of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students at the Australian level.

Figure B2.22: Mean achievement score of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander year 5 public school students, in reading, 2009 to 2013

Graph showing mean achievement score of Aboriginal and Torres Strait islander year 5 public school students, in reading, 2009 to 2013

Source: Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority, National Assessment Program-Literacy and Numeracy, 2009 to 2013

The mean score in reading for Year 9 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students improved from 530 points in 2009 to 542 points in 2013 (Figure B2.23). The results remained below the target in 2012 and 2013, but significantly above results for all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students in Australia.

Figure B2.23: Mean achievement score of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander year 9 public school students, reading, 2009 to 2013

Graph showing mean achievement score of Aboriginal and Torres Strait islander year 9 public school students, reading, 2009 to 2013

Source: Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority, National Assessment Program-Literacy and Numeracy 2009 to 2013

In the ACT, and across Australia, the mean scores for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students were significantly lower than the mean scores of non-Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students across all year levels and all domains.

For ACT Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students this difference equated to approximately 18 months to two years of schooling.

The number of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander enrolments in preschool in public schools increased over the last five years. The number of enrolments of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander preschool students increased by 21 percent from 2009 to 2013 (Figure B2.24).

Figure B2.24: Number of enrolments of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students in preschool in public schools, 2009 to 2013

Graph showing number of enrolments of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students in preschool in public schools, 2009 to 2013

Source: Education and Training Directorate, August census, 2009 to 2013

The number of preschool enrolments of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students in public schools includes students who were attending a preschool program at a specialist school and as an early entry student.

Further information on this measure can be obtained by emailing to ETDAnnualReport@act.gov.au.

The attendance rate of students in ACT public schools was above 91 percent during 2009 to 2012. The attendance rate exceeded 92 percent for 2013 and was above the target for the first time (Figure B2.25).

Figure B2.25: Attendance rate of public school students in year 1 to year 10, 2009 to 2013

Graph showing attendance rate of public school students in year 1 to year 10, 2009 to 2013

Source: Education and Training Directorate

The student attendance rate is the number of actual full-time equivalent student-days attended by full-time students in years 1 to 10 as a percentage of the total number of possible student-days over the period.

A data quality statement on this measure can be obtained from Report on Government Services page on the Australian Productivity Commission website at www.pc.gov.au.

4. Connecting With Families and the Community

We will partner with families and engage with the community to build meaningful relationships.

An indicator of stakeholder confidence in public education is the retention of year 10 students in public schools to year 11 in public colleges. The results have been around 90 percent over the last five years, with 93 percent in 2013-14. Similarly, a high proportion (85%) of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students also proceeded to study year 11 at public colleges in 2014. Although this was slightly lower than for all students, the proportion increased over time, from 78 percent in 2009-10 (Figure B2.26).

Figure B2.26: Percentage of year 10 students who proceed to public secondary college education

Graph showing percentage of year 10 students who proceed to secondary college education

Source: Education and Training Directorate

The percentage of year 10 students who proceed to public secondary college education reports the total number of year 10 students in public high schools, as at August census, who enrolled in year 11 at public colleges as at February census in the following year.

Further information on this measure can be obtained by emailing to ETDAnnualReport@act.gov.au.

Figure B2.27 indicated that there was a high level of parent and carer satisfaction with education at public schools over the last five years. Satisfaction levels improved from 85.3 percent in 2009 to 86.0 percent in 2012 before dropping to 83.1 percent in 2013.

Figure B2.27: Overall satisfaction of parents and carers with the education provided at public schools, 2009 to 2013

Graph showing overall satisfaction of parents and carers with the education provided at public schools, 2009 to 2013

Source: Education and Training Directorate, Satisfaction Surveys, 2009 to 2013

Parent and carer satisfaction is based on a survey in August each year of parents and carers of students attending public schools. In determining overall parent and carer satisfaction, the question 'Overall I am satisfied with my child's education at this school' is used. Responses are collected on a five point scale with only statements of 'agree' or 'strongly agree' being used to calculate overall satisfaction rates.

Further information on this measure can be obtained by emailing to ETDAnnualReport@act.gov.au.

The community's confidence in public education was reflected through an increasing number of preschool enrolments in public schools. Preschool enrolments grew by 13.6 percent from 4,033 enrolments in August 2009 to 4,583 enrolments in August 2013. The target was exceeded by 158 enrolments (Figure B2.28).

Figure B2.28: Number of enrolments in preschool in public schools, 2009 to 2013

Graph showing number of enrolments in preschool in public schools, 2009 to 2013

Source: Education and Training Directorate, August census, 2009 to 2013

The number of preschool enrolments in public schools in August included students who were attending a preschool program at a specialist school and as early entry students.

Further information on this measure can be obtained by emailing to ETDAnnualReport@act.gov.au.

Public schools continued to enrol the majority of ACT students. Public school enrolments as a proportion of overall ACT enrolments was stable from 2010 to 2014 (Figure B2.29).

Figure B2.29: Proportion of school enrolments, 2010 to 2014

Graph showing proportion of school enroments, 2010 to 2014

Source: Education and Training Directorate, February census, 2010 to 2014

The proportion of school enrolments includes all students enrolled from preschool to year 12 in all ACT schools, including specialist schools, at February census.

Further information on this measure can be obtained by emailing to ETDAnnualReport@act.gov.au.

5. Business Innovation and Improvement

We will support innovation, improve our business systems and be open and accountable for our decisions.

Improvement was seen in the staff retention rate in the Directorate. The Directorate has set its staff retention target at 92.0 percent. The result of 94.7 percent in 2013 was an improvement from 93.9 percent in 2012 (Figure B2.30).

Figure B2.30: Staff retention rate, 2009 to 2013

Graph showing staff retention rate, 2009 to 2013

Source: Education and Training Directorate

The staff retention rate is expressed as a percentage of all staff retained in the finiancial year.

The rate is calculated by dividing the number of permanent staff employed at the last pay day in June of the proceeding year plus the number of commencements during the financial year, minus the number of separations in the same financial year, by the number of staff at the last pay day of the preceding year and commencements during the financial year.

The staff retention rate is the headcount of permanent school -based and office-based staff in all classification streams. Staff on long service leave are excluded from these counts.

Further information on this measure can be obtained by emailing to ETDAnnualReport@act.gov.au.

The Directorate, in line with ACT Government policy, is committed to making government decisions transparent through Open Government initiatives. The freedom of information (FOI) process is a mechanism allowing the community to access information held by the Directorate. The number of new FOI requests in a financial year increased from 21 in 2009-10 to 40 in 2010-11 and was reasonably consistent from then to 2013-14 (Figure B2.31).

Figure B2.31: Number of new FOI requests, 2009-10 to 2013-14

Graph showing number of new FOI requests, 2009-10 to 2013-14

Source: Education and Training Directorate

The number of new FOI requests is the total number of requests received by the Directorate in a financial year under section 79(2) of the Freedom of Information Act 1989.

Further information on this measure can be obtained by emailing to ETDAnnualReport@act.gov.au.

A steady capital works program was undertaken to build new schools and renew existing schools. Electricity consumption dropped, resulting in increased efficiencies in resource use and environmental sustainability.

The Government allocated $667.5 million over the last five years to build new schools and upgrade facilities at existing schools. Gungahlin College, Harrison School, Neville Bonner Primary and Franklin Early Childhood Schools opened in the last five years, meeting increasing student enrolments in north Canberra. Namadgi School was a new school in Tuggeranong, along with substantial capital works at Taylor Primary School and Canberra College (performing arts centre).

Annual capital works expenditure reduced from a high of approximately $200 million for the 2009-10 and 2010-11 financial years to $75 million for the 2013-14 financial year. This 2010-11 to 2011-12 reduction in annual capital works expenditure reflects the completion of projects under the Building the Education Revolution and substantial construction works at Gungahlin College and Namadgi School in 2011-12.

The Directorate is committed to ecological sustainable development through increasing energy efficiency, thereby reducing its carbon footprint.

Reduction in the carbon footprint by the Directorate's motor vehicle fleet was achieved in the last four years. The number of kilometres travelled by fleet cars reduced to 202,160 in 2013-14 from 301,657 in 2010-11, a 33 percent reduction.

Figure B2.32: Number of kilometres travelled by fleet cars, 2010-11 to 2013-14

Graph showing number of kilometres travelled by fleet cars, 2010-11 to 2013-14

Source: Education and Training Directorate

The total number of kilometres is the distance travelled by the Directorate's fleet of office based vehicles. It is measured using opening and closing odometer readings in each of the Directorate's vehicles used during the financial year.

Further information on this measure can be obtained by emailing to ETDAnnualReport@act.gov.au.


For further information contact:
Director
Planning and Performance
(02) 6205 5511