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D1 Public Interest Disclosure


The Public Interest Disclosure Act 2012 (the Act) came into effect on 1 February 2013. It improves on the previous legislation (the Public Interest Disclosure Act 1994) by broadening and clarifying the types of wrongdoing that fall within the definition of disclosable conduct; establishes a clear reporting pathway for the receipt and handling of disclosures; and provides specific circumstances under which a disclosure can be made to a third party.

Disclosable conduct includes activity by an individual or an ACT Public Sector entity that:

The Commissioner for Public Administration has developed guidelines for the way in which the ACT Public Service and other public entities covered by the Act should handle public interest disclosures (PIDs). The guidelines were notified on 6 June 2013 and are divided into two parts:

Part One is relevant to all readers. It looks at who and what is covered and provides general information about making a disclosure and the PID framework established by the Act.

Part Two is about the coordination and handling of disclosures and PIDs. It was written with an internal focus and aims to assist those with responsibility for managing disclosures and PIDs.

Under the Act, these guidelines serve as a foundation for all ACT public sector entities which must develop their own internal procedures relating to the handling of PIDs. The Directorate's procedures are available on our website at http://www.det.act.gov.au/about_us/public_interest_disclosures.

Summary of Disclosures

No disclosures were received in the 2013-14 reporting period.


For further information contact:
Director
Governance and Assurance
(02) 6205 9329

Weetangera Primary School - Sea of Hands

Weetangera Primary School students contributed to the 'Sea of Hands' display at the Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies in Acton as part of the sixth anniversary of the Apology to the Stolen Generations. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students and their friends planted plastic hands in the colours of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander flag to symbolise support for rights, respect and reconciliation.

The Weetangera Primary School Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students (known  as the Yirri Dancers) and some ex-Yirri Dancers from Belconnen High School participated. The Sea of Hands, created by the not-for-profit organisation, ANTaR, has become a symbol of the People's Movement for Reconciliation.

Photos showing Weetangera Primary School students contributing to 'Sea of Hands' display at the Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies Photos showing Weetangera Primary School students contributing to 'Sea of Hands' display at the Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies