B.2 Performance Analysis

The Directorate launched the Strategic Plan 2014-2017: Education Capital: Leading the Nation in October 2013. The Strategic Plan guides the organisation and informs its clients and stakeholders about key priorities of the Directorate. The Plan identifies five priority areas for the four-year period:

  • Quality learning;
  • Inspirational teaching and leadership;
  • High expectations, high performance;
  • Connecting with families and the community, and
  • Business innovation and improvement.

Performance against these priorities in the reporting period is discussed in this section.


Quality learning

We will ensure all learners have access to powerful and relevant learning experiences.

Quality learning is the core element of the Directorate's service provision. It can be measured through the performance of students in national and international assessments.

Literacy

NAPLAN is conducted in all states and territories in May each year. Students in year 3, 5, 7 and 9 are tested in reading, language conventions, numeracy and writing.

More detailed information regarding NAPLAN can be found at www.nap.edu.au

The performance of year 5 public school students in reading is shown by the mean achievement score in the National Assessment Program - Literacy and Numeracy (NAPLAN). Figure B2.1 shows that the 2014 mean achievement score for year 5 students in reading met the ACT target and was higher than the national mean.

Figure B2.1: Mean achievement score of all year 5 public school students in reading in NAPLAN, 2010 to 2014Figure B2.1: Mean achievement score of all year 5 public school students in reading in NAPLAN, 2010 to 2014 Source: Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority, National Assessment Program - Literacy and Numeracy 2010 to 2014

The performance of year 9 public school students in reading was consistently higher than the national mean. The Education and Training Directorate continues to work to further increase the performance of year 9 students, in order to achieve the aspirational target. Performance was higher in the latest two years than in the three years prior. (Figure B2.2).

Figure B2.2: Mean achievement score of all year 9 public school students in reading in NAPLAN, 2010 to 2014Figure B2.2: Mean achievement score of all year 9 public school students in reading in NAPLAN, 2010 to 2014 Source: Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority, National Assessment Program - Literacy and Numeracy 2010 to 2014

Numeracy

The performance of year 5 public school students in numeracy was above the national mean. While the ACT mean achievement score has not met the target for the last two years, the results have remained stable and above the mean for Australia (Figure B2.3).

Figure B2.3: Mean achievement score of all year 5 public school students in numeracy in NAPLAN, 2010 to 2014Figure showing mean achievement score of all year 5 public school students in numeracy in NAPLAN, 2010 to 2014 Source: Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority, National Assessment Program - Literacy and Numeracy 2010 to 2014

The mean achievement score of all year 9 public school students in numeracy shows consistency in results since 2010. While the ACT results show similarity to the national mean, they are yet to reach the target.  (Figure B2.4).

Figure B2.4: Mean achievement score of all year 9 public school students in numeracy in NAPLAN, 2010 to 2014Figure showing mean achievement score of all year 9 public school students in numeracy in NAPLAN, 2010 to 2014 Source: Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority, National Assessment Program - Literacy and Numeracy 2010 to 2014

International Computer and Information Literacy Study (ICILS)

The Programme for the International Computer and Information Literacy Study (ICILS) was first conducted in 2013, assessing students in year 8 on their ability to use computers to investigate, create and communicate. It will be conducted worldwide every 5 years by the International Association for the Evaluation of Educational Achievement.

Further information regarding ICILS can be found at: www.iea.nl/.

The performance of ACT students in the 2013 International Computer and Information Literacy Study (ICILS) was consistent with Victoria, NSW, SA, WA while above other states and the ICILS average score. (Figure B2.5).

Figure B2.5: Mean achievement score of ACT students in ICILS in 2013Figure showing mean achievement score of ACT students in ICILS in 2013 Source: International Association for the Evaluation of Educational Achievement, International Computer and Information Literacy Study 2013 International Computer and Information Literacy Study (ICILS)

National Assessment Program - Civics and Citizenship

The National Assessment Program - Civics and Citizenship is a national sample assessment of students' skills, knowledge and understanding of Australia's system of government. It assesses students' understanding of civic life and attitudes, values and participation in civic-related activities at school and in the community. A sample of year 6 students across Australia participated in the testing.

Further information on the assessment is available from www.nap.edu.au.

The performance of ACT year 6 and year 10 students in the 2013 National Assessment Program - Civics and Citizenship continued to show ACT students as among the highest performing in Australia. The results indicate the value of students participating in the governance of their school and extra curricular activities in achieving a greater understanding of Australian government and civic life. The mean score for year 6 ACT students (433) was the highest in the nation, with the ACT performing higher than the national average (403) (Figure B2.6).

Figure B2.6: Mean achievement score of year 6 ACT students in civics and citizenship, 2004 to 2013Figure showing mean achievement score of year 6 ACT students in civics and citizenship, 2004 to 2013 Source: Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority, Civics and Citizenship 2004 to 2013

The mean score of ACT year 10 students (525) was equal highest in Australia, along with NSW, Victoria and Western Australia, and above the national average (511) (Figure B2.7).

Figure B2.7: Mean achievement score of year 10 ACT students in civics and citizenship, 2004 to 2013Mean achievement score of year 10 ACT students in civics and citizenship, 2004 to 2013 Source: Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority, Civics and Citizenship 2004 to 2013 National Assessment Program - Civics and Citizenship

Vocational education and training

The percentage of year 12 students receiving a nationally recognised vocational qualification is the number of year 12students who completed year 12 and achieved a vocational qualification, or equivalent, divided by the total number of students enrolled in year 12 as at February census. Data is obtained from the Board of Senior Secondary Studies and the Directorate's School Census undertaken in February.

Further information on this measure can be obtained by emailing ETDAnnualReport@act.gov.au.

The performance of ACT students in vocational education and training is shown by the percentage of year 12 students who received a nationally recognised qualification (Figure B2.8). During the period from 2010 to 2013 the percentage exceeded or was equal to the target, and in 2014 was at 58 percent,slightly beneath the target of 60 percent. The target of 50 percent of all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students was exceeded.

Figure B2.8: Percentage of year 12 students who received a nationally recognised vocational qualification, 2010 to 2014Figure B2.8: Percentage of year 12 students who received a nationally recognised vocational qualification, 2010 to 2014 Source: Education and Training Directorate

The data in relation to apprentices satisfied with their training is obtained from the annual Student Outcomes Survey of the National Centre for Vocational Education Research. The annual survey measures apprentices' and vocational education and training students' satisfaction with training and post-training employment outcomes.

Further information on this measure can be obtained from www.ncver.edu.au.

Over the five year period from 2010 to 2014, apprentices reported around 80 percent satisfaction with their training (Figure B2.9). Satisfaction levels for ACT apprentices were slightly below satisfaction levels for all apprentices in Australia, but showed a slight increase and exceeded the target in 2014.

Figure B2.9: Percentage of apprentices satisfied with their training under Australian Apprenticeships, 2010 to 2014Figure B2.9: Percentage of apprentices satisfied with their training under Australian Apprenticeships, 2010 to 2014 Source: National Centre for Vocational Education Research, Student Outcomes Survey 2010 to 2014


Inspirational teaching and leadership

We will build the capacities of our teachers and leaders - by design, not by chance.

Average number of years of employment

Average number of years of employment is the total number of years of employment of all employees divided by the total number of employees of the Directorate, based on the headcount of all permanent school and office-based staff in all classification streams as at the last pay day in the financial year. Staff on long service leave are excluded from these counts.

Further information on this measure can be obtained by emailing ETDAnnualReport@act.gov.au.

Quality learning flows from inspirational teaching and school leadership. In 2015 the Directorate employed 4,285 teachers and school leaders.

The average number of years of employment in the Directorate steadily increased from 8.8 years in 2013-14 to 9.0 years in 2014-15 (Figure B2.10). The average length of employment was a sign of a staff-friendly organisational environment and flexible work-life balance employment arrangements.

Figure B2.10: Average number of years of employment with the Directorate, 2010-11 to 2014-15 Table showing average years of services by gender Source: Education and Training Directorate

Use of learning technologies

The proportion of teachers using learning technologies is based on a survey of teachers in ACT public schools conducted in August each year. In determining the proportion, the question 'The use of learning technologies is an integral part of learning and teaching in my classroom' is used. Responses are collected on a five point scale with only statements of 'agree' or 'strongly agree' used to calculate the result.

Further information on this measure can be obtained by emailing ETDAnnualReport@act.gov.au.

In the three years 2012 to 2014, the proportion of teachers in public schools employing the use of learning technologies as an integral part of their teaching practice has remained steady at 83 percent (Figure B2.11).

Figure B2.11: Proportion of teachers using learning technologies, 2010 to 2014 Table showing headcount by diversity group Source: Education and Training Directorate, Satisfaction Surveys 2010 to 2014

Innovative practice

The proportion of teachers and school leaders who felt innovative practice was encouraged is based on a survey of teachers in ACT public schools conducted in August each year. In determining the proportion, the question 'Innovative practice is encouraged' is used. Responses are collected on a five point scale with only statements of 'agree' or 'strongly agree' used to calculate the result.

Further information on this measure can be obtained by emailing ETDAnnualReport@act.gov.au.

The Directorate is committed to continuous innovation and improvement. The proportion of teachers and school leaders who felt innovative practice was encouraged increased from 79 percent in 2010 to 86 percent in 2014 (Figure B2.12).

Figure B2.12: Proportion of teachers and school leaders who felt innovative practice was encouraged, 2010 to 2014Table showing recruitment and separation rates by division/branch Source: Education and Training Directorate, Satisfaction Surveys 2010 to 2014

Development of leadership opportunities

The proportion of teachers and school leaders participating in decision-making is based on a survey of teachers in ACT public schools conducted in August each year. In determining the proportion, the question 'I have opportunities to participate in decision-making' is used. Responses are collected on a five point scale with only statements of 'agree' or 'strongly agree' used to calculate the result.

Further information on this measure can be obtained by emailing ETDAnnualReport@act.gov.au.

A high performing school system encourages the development of leadership capacities of teachers and school leaders for the continuation of quality learning and teaching.

There has been a similar proportion of teachers and leaders in ACT public schools from 2010 to 2014 who reported having opportunities to participate in decision-making (Figure B2.13).

Figure B2.13: Proportion of teachers and school leaders who felt they had opportunities to participate in decision-making, 2010 to 2014
Table showing recruitment and separation rates by division/branch Source: Education and Training Directorate, Satisfaction Surveys 2010 to 2014

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander employees

The number of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander employees is based on the headcount of employees identifying themselves as Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people as at the last payday in the financial year.

Further information on this measure can be obtained by emailing ETDAnnualReport@act.gov.au.

The ACT Public Service committed to more than doubling the number of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander employees by 2015. The number of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander employees within the Education and Training Directorate was around 40 during 2010-11 to 2011-12, before rising to 57 in 2012-13.This number increased to 64 in 2013-14 and was 72 in 2014-15 (Figure B2.14).

Figure B2.14: Number of Directorate Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander employees, 2010-11 to 2014-15Table showing number of Directorate Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander employees Source: Education and Training Directorate


High expectations, high performance

We have high expectations for all and will meet the learning needs of every student.

Student satisfaction

Student satisfaction is based on a survey of students from years 5 to 12 in ACT public schools, excluding students at specialist schools, conducted in August each year. In determining overall student satisfaction, the question 'Overall I am satisfied I am getting a good education at this school' is used. Responses are collected on a five point scale with only statements of 'agree' or 'strongly agree' used to calculate overall satisfaction rates.

Further information on this measure can be obtained by emailing ETDAnnualReport@act.gov.au.

From 2010 to 2012, overall student satisfaction (across primary, high and college sectors) with the quality of education received at public schools remained stable around 80 percent, with a slight drop from 2012 to 2013. There were changes in the administration and content of the survey in 2013, inorder to ensure consistency with the national approach, which may have impacted on that year's slightly lower result. The result increased to 76 percent in 2014 (Figure B2.15).

B2.15: Percentage of overall student satisfaction with education at public schools, 2010 to 2014P\Table showing percentage of overall student satisfaction with education at public schools, 2010 to 2014 Source: Education and Training Directorate, Satisfaction Surveys 2010 to 2014

Year 12 certification

Year 12 certification is the number of students who meet the requirements of a Year 12 Certificate, expressed as a percentage of year 12 enrolments. Data is obtained from the Board of Senior Secondary Studies and the Directorate's School Census undertaken in February. Estimates are calculated based on the number of students completing the requirements of the ACT Year 12 certificate divided by the number of year 12 students as at the ACT School Census.

Further information on this measure can be obtained by emailing ETDAnnualReport@act.gov.au.

The ACT public school certification rate for year 12 was 88.4 percent in 2014, an improvement from 87 percent in 2010 (Figure B2.16).

Figure B2.16: Percentage of year 12 public school students who received a Year 12 Certificate, 2010 to 2014Table showing percentage of year 12 public school students who received a Year 12 Certificate, 2010 to 2014 Source: Education and Training Directorate, Satisfaction Surveys 2010 to 2014

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Year 12 certification rate

The certification rate for year 12 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students in public schools increased from 80.0 percent in 2011 to 86.2 percent in 2012. The rate dropped in 2013 and in 2014 against the target of 80 percent. In February 2014 there were 83 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students enrolled in year 12 at public colleges. Of these, 49 students or 59 percent graduated with a year 12 certificate, less than the target of 66 students or 80% (Figure B2.17).

Figure B2.17: Percentage of year 12 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander public school students who received a year 12 Certificate, 2010 to 2014Percentage of year 12 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander public school students who received a year 12 Certificate, 2010 to 2014 Source: Education and Training Directorate

Year 12 Graduates studying or employed six months after completing year 12

ACT destination data are based on a survey of graduates who successfully complete an ACT year 12 certificate. Graduates from the previous year are surveyed in May of the reference year. The survey frame is drawn from the ACT Board of Senior Secondary Studies administrative records.

The Australian rate is for 15-24 year-olds engaged in full-time study or employment in May of the reference year after finishing year 12 the previous year.

Further information on this measure can be obtained by emailing ETDAnnualReport@act.gov.au.

The percentage of public school year 12 graduates engaged in study or employment has been stable at around 90 percent from 2010 to 2014. This is a higher percentage than the Australian percentage for those years (Figure B2.18).

The Directorate continues to develop programs and employ high quality teaching and learning to ensure that student are employed and/or studying after leaving school.

Figure B2.18: Percentage of public school year 12 graduates studying or employed six months after completing year 12, 2010 to 2014
Table showing percentage of public school year 12 graduates studying or employed six months after completing year 12, 2010 to 2014 Source: Education and Training Directorate

Vocational education and training graduates with improved employment status after training

Proportion of graduates with improved employment status is defined as graduates aged 20-64 years with an improved employment status after training divided by the total graduates aged 20-64 tears. The data are derived from the annual Student Outcomes Survey of the National Centre for Vocational Education Research. The annual survey seeks to measure apprentices' and vocational education and training students' satisfaction with training and post-training employment outcomes.

Further information on this measure can be obtained from www.ncver.edu.au.

Over the five year period from 2010 to 2014, the proportion of vocational education and training graduates with improved employment status after training remained above the national results. In 2014, the proportion of graduates with improved employment status after training increased from 65 percent to 69 percent and exceeded the ACT target for the first time (Figure B2.19)

Figure B2.19: Proportion of graduates with improved employment status after training, 2010 to 2014Table showing roportion of graduates with improved employment status after training, 2010 to 2014 Source: National Centre for Vocational Education Research, Student Outcomes Survey 2013

Apparent retention rate year 7 to year 12

The apparent retention rate is an indicative measure of the number of students who have stayed in school, as at a designated year level. It is the percentage of the respective cohort group that those students would be expected to have come from assuming an expected progression of one grade per year.

Further information on this measure can be obtained from www.abs.gov.au

The apparent retention rate of ACT public school students increased over the five year period from 2010 to 2014 from 107 per cent to 113 per cent (Figure B2.20).

Figure B2.20: Apparent retention rate from year 7 to year 12, public school students, ACT and Australia, 2010 to 2014Figure showing apparent retention rate from year 7 to year 12, public school students, ACT and Australia, 2010 to 2014 Source: Australian Bureau of Statistics Schools, Australia 2014

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander literacy

The performance of year 5 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander public school students in reading is shown by the mean achievement score in NAPLAN. Figure B2.21 shows that mean achievement scores for year 5 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander public school students in reading declined in 2014 when compared with 2013 results, but were higher than previous results. The ACT mean achievement score of 453 was substantially above the national mean of 422, and was higher than the target.

Figure B2.21: Mean achievement score of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander year 5 public school students, in reading, 2010 to 2014
Mean achievement score of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander year 5 public school students, in reading,  2010 to 2014 Source: Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority, National Assessment Program - Literacy and Numeracy 2010 to 2014, Education and Training Directorate

The performance of year 9 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander public school students in reading is shown by the NAPLAN mean achievement score. Figure B2.22 shows similar mean achievement scores for the ACT in reading from 2010 to 2014, increasing over the period 2012 to 2014 and consistently higher than the national mean. The Directorate continues to work towards achievement of the target, particularly through targetted programs to assist Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students.

Figure B2.22: Mean achievement score of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander year 9 public school students, in reading, 2010 to 2014
Mean achievement score of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander year 9 public school students, in reading, 2010 to 2014 Source: Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority, National Assessment Program - Literacy and Numeracy 2010 to 2014, Education and Training Directorate

Numeracy

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander numeracy

The performance of year 5 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander public school students in numeracy is shown by the NAPLAN mean achievement score. Figure B2.23 shows that the numeracy mean achievement scores for year 5 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students declined in 2014 from 2013, but were similar to results from 2010 to 2012. ACT mean scores for year 5 numeracy Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students from 2010 to 2014 were consistently above the national mean scores for year 5 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students.

Figure B2.23: Mean achievement score of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander year 5 public school students, in numeracy, 2010 to 2014Mean achievement score of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander year 5 public school students, in numeracy, 2010 to 2014 Source: Education and Training Directorate, August Census 2010 to 2014

The performance of year 9 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander public school students in numeracy is shown by the NAPLAN mean achievement score. Figure B2.24 shows that the numeracy mean achievement scores for year 9 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students in the ACT were consistently above the numeracy mean achievement scores for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students across Australia.

Figure B2.24: Mean achievement score of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander year 9 public school students, in numeracy, 2010 to 2014Mean achievement score of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander year 9 public school students, in numeracy, 2010 to 2014 Source: Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority, National Assessment Program - Literacy and Numeracy, 2010 to 2014

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander enrolments in preschool in public schools

The number of preschool enrolments of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students in public schools includes students who were attending a preschool program at a specialist school and as an early entry student, as at August 2014.

Further information on this measure can be obtained by emailing ETDAnnualReport@act.gov.au.

The number of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander student enrolments in preschool in public schools consistently increased over the last five years. In 2014 the result of 267 students substantially exceeded the target of 225 enrolments (Figure B2.25).

Figure B2.25: Number of enrolments of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students in preschool in public schools, 2010 to 2014Table showing Number of enrolments of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students in preschool in public schools, 2010 to 2014 Source: Education and Training Directorate, August Census 2010 to 2014

Attendance

The student attendance rate is the number of actual full-time equivalent student-days attended by full-time students in years 1 to 10 as a percentage of the total number of possible student-days over the period.

A data quality statement on this measure can be obtained from the 'Report on Government Services' page of the Australian Productivity Commission website at www.pc.gov.au.

The attendance rate of students in ACT public schools was above 91 percent during 2010 to 2012. The attendance rate exceeded 92 percent for 2013. The rate declined slightly in 2014 to 91.5 percent; however the 2014 target of 91.5 was achieved. (Figure B2.26).

Figure B2.26: Attendance rate of public school students in year 1 to 10, 2010 to 2014Table showing Attendance rate of public school students in year 1 to 10, 2010 to 2014 Source: Education and Training Directorate


Connecting with families and the community

We will partner with families and engage with the community to build meaningful relationships.

The percentage of year 10 students who proceed to public secondary college education reports the total number of year 10 students in public high schools, as of the August census, who enrolled in year 11 at public colleges as at February census in the following year.

Further information on this measure can be obtained by emailing ETDAnnualReport@act.gov.au.

An indicator of stakeholder confidence in public education is the retention of year 10 students in public schools to year 11 in public colleges. The percentage of year 10 students who proceeded to public secondary education increased over the last five years. The percentage of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students who proceeded to public secondary education also increased over the last five years.

Figure B2.27: Percentage of year 10 students who proceed to public secondary college educationFigure showing percentage of year 10 students who proceed to public secondary college education Source: Education and Training Directorate

Parent and carer satisfaction with education provided at public schools

Parent and career satisfaction is based on a survey in August each year of parents and carers of students attending public schools. In determining overall parent and carer satisfaction, the question 'Overall I am satisfied with my child's education at the school' is used. Responses are collected on a five point scale with only statements of 'agree' or 'strongly agree' being used to calculate overall satisfaction rates.

Further information on this measure can be obtained by emailing ETDAnnualReport@act.gov.au.

Figure B2.28 indicates that there was a high level of parent and carer satisfaction with the education provided at public schools over the last five years. The level of overall satisfaction increased from 83 percent in 2011 to 85 percent in 2014, but was just below the target of 88 percent.

Figure B2.28: Percentage of overall satisfaction of parents and carer with the education provided at public schools, 2010 to 2014Table showing Percentage of overall satisfaction of parents and carer with the education provided at public schools, 2010 to 2014 Source: Education and Training Directorate

Preschool enrolment

The number of preschool enrolments in public schools in August included students who were attending a preschool program at a specialist school and as early entry students.

Further information on this measure can be obtained by emailing ETDAnnualReport@act.gov.au.

The community's confidence in public education was reflected through an increasing number of preschool enrolments in public schools. Preschool enrolments in public schools increased from 4,583 in 2013 to 4,873 in 2014, an increase of 290 students. In 2014 the target was exceeded by 373 enrolments (FigureB2.29).

Figure B2:29: Number of enrolments in preschool in public schools, 2010 to 2014Table showing Number of enrolments in preschool in public schools, 2010 to 2014 Source: Education and Training Directorate, August Census, 2010 to 2014

ACT School enrolments

The proportion of school enrolments includes all students enrolled from preschool to year 12 in all ACT schools, including specialist schools, at February census.

Further information on this measure can be obtained by emailing ETDAnnualReport@act.gov.au.

Public schools continued to enrol the majority of students. Public school enrolments as proportion of overall ACT enrolments was stable from 2011 to 2014 (Figure B2.30).

Figure B2:30: Proportion of school enrolments, 2011 to 2015 (%) Table showing Proportion of school enrolments, 2011 to 2015 Source: Education and Training Directorate, February Census, 2011 to 2015.


Business innovation and improvement

We will support innovation, improve our business systems and be open and accountable for our decisions.

Staff retention rate

The staff retention rate is expressed as a percentage of all staff retained in the financial year.

The rate is calculated by dividing the number of permanent staff employed at the last pay day in June of the proceeding year, plus the number of commencements during the financial year, minus the number of separations in the same financial year, by the number of staff at the last pay day of the proceeding year and commencements during the financial year.

The staff retention rate is the headcount of permanent school-based and office-based staff in all classification streams. Staff on long service leave are excluded from these counts.

Further information on this measure can be obtained by emailing ETDAnnualReport@act.gov.au.

The staff retention rate in the Directorate was stable over the last five years, with a retention rate of at least 93 percent each year, exceeding the target staff retention rate of 92 percent between 2011 and 2014 (Figure B2.31).

Figure B2:31: Staff retention rate, 2010 to 2014

Table showing Staff retention rate, 2010 to 2014 Source: Education and Training Directorate

Freedom of Information (FOI)

The number of FOI requests is the total number of requests received by the Directorate in a financial year under section 79(2) of the Freedom of Information Act 1989 (ACT).

Further information on this measure can be obtained by emailing ETDAnnualReport@act.gov.au.

The Directorate, in line with ACT Government policy, is committed to making government decisions transparent through Open Government initiatives. The Freedom of Information (FOI) process is a mechanism allowing the community to access information held by the Directorate. The number of new FOI requests in a financial year increased from 40 in 2010-11 to 45 in 2014-15 (Figure B2.32).

Figure B2:32: Number of new FOI requests, 2010-11 to 2014-15Table showing Number of new FOI requests, 2010-11 to 2014-15 Source: Education and Training Directorate

For further information contact:
Director
Planning and Performance
(02) 6205 5511