B.2 Performance Analysis

The Strategic Plan 2014-2017: Education Capital: Leading the Nation guides the organisation towards the achievement of our vision that every child, young person and adult in the ACT will benefit from a high quality, accessible education, childcare and training system. The Plan identifies five priority areas for the four-year period:

  • Quality learning;
  • Inspirational teaching and leadership;
  • High expectations, high performance;
  • Connecting with families and the community; and
  • Business innovation and improvement.

Performance against these priorities in 2015-16 is described in this section.

QUALITY LEARNING

We will ensure all learners have access to powerful and relevant learning experiences.

Quality learning is the core element of the Directorate’s service provision. ACT Public Schools maintain high expectations for student learning and work continuously to enhance learning outcomes of students. Quality learning initiatives in public schools ensure students’ success at and beyond school. Quality learning can be measured through the performance of students in national and international assessments.

ACT schools use NAPLAN data to support decision making and determine strategies at the school level to improve student learning outcomes. The Directorate is committed to empowering all school leadership teams to make local decisions about the professional development and training opportunities that best meet the needs of their staff and achieve each school’s performance targets and priorities.

LITERACY

National Assessment Program - Literacy and Numeracy (NAPLAN) is conducted in all states and territories in May each year. Students in years 3, 5, 7 and 9 are tested in reading, language conventions, numeracy and writing.

More detailed information regarding NAPLAN can be found at www.nap.edu.au external link

The performance of year 5 public school students in reading is shown by the mean achievement score in NAPLAN. Figure B2.1 shows that the 2015 mean achievement score for year 5 students in reading met the ACT target and was higher than the national mean. ACT year 5 results have remained relatively stable since 2011 while the performance of students in other jurisdictions, particularly Western Australia, Queensland and the Northern Territory, have been improving. As a result the gap between the ACT performance and the national performance has been decreasing.

FIGURE B2.1: MEAN ACHIEVEMENT SCORE OF ALL YEAR 5 PUBLIC SCHOOL STUDENTS IN READING IN NAPLAN, 2011 TO 2015

Figure showing mean achievement score of all year 5 public school students in reading in NAPLAN, 2011 to 2015

Source: Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority, National Assessment Program - Literacy and Numeracy 2011 to 2015

The performance of year 9 public school students in reading was consistently higher than the national mean (Figure B2.2). There has been no significant change in ACT year 9 reading results since NAPLAN testing began in 2008. All variations in ACT results have to a large extent mirrored changes in national results.

FIGURE B2.2: MEAN ACHIEVEMENT SCORE OF ALL YEAR 9 PUBLIC SCHOOL STUDENTS IN READING IN NAPLAN, 2011 TO 2015

Figure showing mean achievement score of all year 9 public school students in reading in NAPLAN, 2011 to 2015

Source: Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority, National Assessment Program - Literacy and Numeracy 2011 to 2015

NUMERACY

The performance of year 5 public school students in numeracy was above the national mean. The ACT mean achievement score was slightly below the target for 2015 (Figure B2.3). Year 5 numeracy results have consistently been above the national mean since 2008, with significant growth in mean results between 2008 and 2012. ACT year 5 results have since reached a plateau between 2013 and 2015.

FIGURE B2.3: MEAN ACHIEVEMENT SCORE OF ALL YEAR 5 PUBLIC SCHOOL STUDENTS IN NUMERACY IN NAPLAN, 2011 TO 2015

Figure showing mean achievement score of all year 5 public school students in numeracy in NAPLAN, 2011 to 2015

Source: Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority, National Assessment Program - Literacy and Numeracy 2011 to 2015

The mean achievement score of all year 9 public school students in numeracy shows consistency in results since 2011. The ACT mean score met the target in 2015 (Figure B2.4). Year 9 numeracy mean scores have been statistically higher than national results across the years of NAPLAN. Variations in results have tended to mirror the national results and there have been no statistically significant changes across 2008-2015.

FIGURE B2.4: MEAN ACHIEVEMENT SCORE OF ALL YEAR 9 PUBLIC SCHOOL STUDENTS IN NUMERACY IN NAPLAN, 2011 TO 2015

Figure showing mean achievement score of all year 9 public school students in numeracy in NAPLAN, 2011 to 2015

Source: Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority, National Assessment Program - Literacy and Numeracy 2011 to 2015

NATIONAL ASSESSMENT PROGRAM - INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGY (ICT) LITERACY

The National Assessment Program - ICT Literacy (NAP-ICT) is a national sample assessment of students’ skills, knowledge and understanding of general rather than specialist technical information and communications technology skills. It assesses students’ ability to appropriately access, manage, integrate and evaluate information, develop new understandings and communicate with others in order to participate effectively in society. A sample of year 6 and year 10 students across Australia participated in the testing.

Further information on the assessment is available from http://nap.edu.au/nap-sample-assessments/ict-literacy external link.

The performance of ACT year 10 students in the 2014 NAP-ICT was above the Australian mean. However, there has been a statistically significant (62 points) decline in ACT students’ performance from 2008 to 2014 (Figure B2.5). This decline is consistent with the national result. There are a number of potential factors behind this national trend including the possibility that the test does not cater to changes in ICT practices.

Students in ACT Public Schools develop a wide range of skills to prepare them for a changing world. They access real-world learning platforms that are easy to use and familiar to them, so they can learn, create, communicate and collaborate from anywhere, any time. ACT schools are progressively implementing the Australian Curriculum: Digital Technologies and Information and Communication Technology general capability. The Directorate supports the development of teachers in digital technologies through regular training, online communities and the celebration of good practice.

FIGURE B2.5: MEAN ACHIEVEMENT SCORE OF ACT AND AUSTRALIAN YEAR 10 STUDENTS IN NAP ICT, 2005 TO 2014

Figure showing the mean achievement score of ACT and Australian year 10 students in NAP ICT, 2005 to 2014

Source: Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority, National Assessment Program ICT Literacy 2005 to 2014

NATIONAL ASSESSMENT PROGRAM - CIVICS AND CITIZENSHIP

The National Assessment Program - Civics and Citizenship is a national sample assessment of students’ skills, knowledge and understanding of Australia’s system of government. It assesses students’ understanding of civic life and attitudes, values and participation in civic-related activities at school and in the community. A sample of year 6 and year 10 students across Australia participated in the testing.

Further information on the assessment is available from www.nap.edu.au/nap-sample-assessments/civics-and-citizenship/napsa-civics-and-citizenship.html external link.

The performance of ACT year 6 and year 10 students in the 2013 National Assessment Program – Civics and Citizenship continued to show ACT students as among the highest performing in Australia. The results indicate the value of students participating in the governance of their school and extracurricular activities in achieving a greater understanding of Australian government and civic life. The mean score for year 6 ACT students (433) was the highest in the nation, with the ACT performing higher than the national average (403) (Figure B2.6).

FIGURE B2.6: MEAN ACHIEVEMENT SCORE OF YEAR 6 ACT STUDENTS IN CIVICS AND CITIZENSHIP, 2004 TO 2013

Figure showing mean achievement score of year 6 ACT students in civics and citizenship, 2004 to 2013

Source: Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority, National Assessment Program Civics and Citizenship 2004 to 2013

The mean score of ACT year 10 students (525) was equal highest in Australia, along with NSW, Victoria and Western Australia, and above the national average (511) (Figure B2.7).

FIGURE B2.7: MEAN ACHIEVEMENT SCORE OF YEAR 10 ACT STUDENTS IN CIVICS AND CITIZENSHIP, 2004 TO 2013

Figure showing mean achievement score of year 10 ACT students in civics and citizenship, 2004 to 2013

Source: Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority, National Assessment Program - Civics and Citizenship

VOCATIONAL EDUCATION AND TRAINING

The percentage of year 12 students receiving a nationally recognised vocational qualification is the number of year 12 students who completed year 12 and achieved a vocational qualification, or equivalent, divided by the total number of students enrolled in year 12 at the February census of a given year. Data is obtained from the ACT Board of Senior Secondary Studies and the Directorate’s School Census undertaken in February.

Further information on this measure can be obtained by emailing ETDAnnualReport@act.gov.au.

The performance of ACT students in vocational education and training is shown by the percentage of year 12 students who received a nationally recognised qualification (Figure B2.8). From 2011 to 2012 the percentage of all students exceeded or was equal to the target, but was slightly beneath the target of 60 percent from 2013 to 2015. The target of 50 percent of all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students was exceeded over the last three years.

FIGURE B2.8: PERCENTAGE OF YEAR 12 STUDENTS WHO RECEIVED A NATIONALLY RECOGNISED VOCATIONAL QUALIFICATION, 2011 TO 2015

Figure showing percentage of year 12 students who received a nationally recognised vocational qualification, 2011 to 2015

Source: ACT Education Directorate

APPRENTICE SATISFACTION

The data in relation to apprentices satisfied with their training is obtained from the annual Student Outcomes Survey of the National Centre for Vocational Education Research. The annual survey measures apprentices’ and vocational education and training students’ satisfaction with training and post-training employment outcomes.

Further information on this measure can be obtained from www.ncver.edu.au external link.

Over the five year period from 2011 to 2015, apprentices reported around 80 percent satisfaction with their training (Figure B2.9). Satisfaction levels for ACT apprentices were slightly below satisfaction levels for all apprentices in Australia, but showed a slight increase and exceeded the target in 2014 and 2015.

FIGURE B2.9: PERCENTAGE OF APPRENTICES SATISFIED WITH THEIR TRAINING UNDER AUSTRALIAN APPRENTICESHIPS, 2011 TO 2015

Figure showing percentage of apprentices satisfied with their training under Australian Apprenticeships, 2011 to 2015

Source: ACT Education Directorate

ACT SCHOOL ENROLMENTS

The proportion of school enrolments includes all students enrolled from preschool to year 12 in all ACT schools, including specialist schools, at February census of a given year.

Further information on this measure can be obtained by emailing ETDAnnualReport@act.gov.au.

ACT Public Schools continued to enrol the majority of students. ACT Public School enrolments as proportion of overall ACT enrolments was stable from 2012 to 2016 (Figure B2.10).

FIGURE B2.10: PROPORTION OF SCHOOL ENROLMENTS, 2012 TO 2016

Figure showing the proportion of school enrolments, 2012 to 2016

Source: ACT Education Directorate

PRESCHOOL ENROLMENT

The number of preschool enrolments in ACT Public Schools in August census of a given year, includes students who were attending a preschool program at a specialist school and as early entry students.

Further information on this measure can be obtained by emailing ETDAnnualReport@act.gov.au.

Preschool enrolments in both ACT Public Schools and in non-government school providers have been steadily increasing over the last five years (Figure B2.11).

FIGURE B2.11: NUMBER OF ENROLMENTS IN PRESCHOOL IN PUBLIC SCHOOLS, 2011 TO 2015

Figure showing the number of enrolments in preschool in public schools, 2011 to 2015

Source: ACT Education Directorate

ABORIGINAL AND TORRES STRAIT ISLANDER ENROLMENTS IN PRESCHOOL IN PUBLIC SCHOOLS

The number of preschool enrolments of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students in public schools includes students who were attending a preschool program at a specialist school and as an early entry student, as at August census of a given year.

Further information on this measure can be obtained by emailing ETDAnnualReport@act.gov.au

The number of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander student enrolments in preschool in public schools consistently increased over the last five years. In 2015 the result of 288 students substantially exceeded the target of 225 enrolments (Figure B2.12).

FIGURE B2.12: NUMBER OF ENROLMENTS OF ABORIGINAL AND TORRES STRAIT ISLANDER STUDENTS IN PRESCHOOL IN PUBLIC SCHOOLS, 2011 TO 2015

Figure showing number of enrolments of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students in preschool in public schools, 2011 to 2015

Source: ACT Education Directorate

INSPIRATIONAL TEACHING AND LEADERSHIP

We will build the capacities of our teachers and leaders - by design, not by chance.

Quality learning flows from inspirational teaching and school leadership. In 2016 the Directorate employed 4,278 teachers and school leaders.

REAL RETENTION

The real retention rate for preschool to kindergarten and year 6 to year 7 represents the number of children continuing in public education (at the February school census of a given year) as a proportion of the number of children enrolled in the prior year level (at the August school census).

The real retention rate for year 7 to year 12 represents the number of children enrolled in year 12 in public schools at the February school census of a given year below as a proportion of the number of children enrolled in year 7 five years ago at the August school census.

Further information on this measure can be obtained by emailing ETDAnnualReport@act.gov.au

The proportions of students continuing in public education from preschool to kindergarten, year 6 to year 7 and year 7 to year 12 have increased between 2013 and 2016 (Figure B2.13). Real retention is affected by a number of factors including but not limited to:

  • migration out of the ACT
  • inter-sector (affiliation) transfer
  • children of diplomats and short term international exchange students returning to their place of origin
  • students progressing at a faster or slower than expected rate of one grade a year.

TABLE B2.13: REAL RETENTION RATES IN PUBLIC SCHOOLS FROM PRESCHOOL TO KINDERGARTEN, YEAR 6 TO YEAR 7 AND YEAR 7 TO YEAR 12, 2013 TO 2016

Figure showing the real retention rates in public schools from preschool to kindergarten, year 6 to year 7 and year 7 to year 12, 2013 to 2016

Source: ACT Education Directorate

STAFF RETENTION RATE

The staff retention rate is expressed as a percentage of all staff retained in the financial year.

The rate is calculated by dividing the number of permanent staff employed at the last pay day in June of the proceeding year, plus the number of commencements during the financial year, minus the number of separations in the same financial year, by the number of staff at the last pay day of the proceeding year and commencements during the financial year.

The staff retention rate is the headcount of permanent school-based and office-based staff in all classification streams. Staff on long service leave are excluded from these counts.

Further information on this measure can be obtained by emailing ETDAnnualReport@act.gov.au.

The staff retention rate in the Directorate was gradually increasing over the last five years, with a retention rate of at least 93 percent each year, exceeded the target of 92 percent between 2011 and 2015 (Figure B2.14).

FIGURE B2.14: STAFF RETENTION RATE, 2011 TO 2015

Figure showing staff retention rate, 2011 to 2015

Source: ACT Education Directorate

AVERAGE NUMBER OF YEARS OF EMPLOYMENT

Average number of years of employment is the total number of years of employment of all employees divided by the total number of employees of the Directorate, based on the headcount of all permanent school and office-based staff in all classification streams as at the last pay day in June in the financial year. Staff on long service leave are excluded from these counts.

Further information on this measure can be obtained by emailing ETDAnnualReport@act.gov.au.

The average number of years of employment in the Directorate steadily increased from 8.6 years in 2012 to 9.0 years in 2015 and remained steady for 2016 (Figure B2.15).

FIGURE B2.15: AVERAGE NUMBER OF YEARS OF EMPLOYMENT WITH THE DIRECTORATE, 2012 TO 2016

Figure showing average number of years of employment with the Directorate, 2012 to 2016

Source: ACT Education Directorate

ABORIGINAL AND TORRES STRAIT ISLANDER EMPLOYEES

The number of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander employees is based on the headcount of employees identifying themselves as Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people as at the last payday in June of each referenced year.

Further information on this measure can be obtained by emailing ETDAnnualReport@act.gov.au.

The ACT Public Service committed to more than doubling the number of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander employees by 2015. The number of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander employees within the Education Directorate was 40 in 2012 and has more than doubled to 91 in 2016. The increase of 19 employees was the largest from 2015 to 2016 over the last five years (Figure B2.16).

FIGURE B2.16: NUMBER OF DIRECTORATE ABORIGINAL AND TORRES STRAIT ISLANDER EMPLOYEES, 2012 TO 2016

Figure showing the number of Directorate Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander employees, 2012 to 2016

Source: ACT Education Directorate

HIGH EXPECTATIONS, HIGH PERFORMANCE

We have high expectations for all and will meet the learning needs of every student.

STUDENT SATISFACTION

Student satisfaction is based on a survey of students from years 5 to 12 in ACT Public Schools, excluding students at specialist schools, conducted in August each year. In determining overall student satisfaction, the question ‘Overall I am satisfied I am getting a good education at this school’ is used. Responses are collected on a five point scale with only statements of ‘agree’ or ‘strongly agree’ used to calculate overall satisfaction rates.

Further information on this measure can be obtained by emailing ETDAnnualReport@act.gov.au.

During 2011 and 2012, overall student satisfaction (across primary, high and college sectors) with the quality of education received at public schools remained stable around 80 percent, with a slight drop from 2012 to 2013. The satisfaction level is on the rise from 2013 (Figure B2.17).

B2.17: PERCENTAGE OF OVERALL STUDENT SATISFACTION WITH EDUCATION AT PUBLIC SCHOOLS, 2011 TO 2015

Figure showing percentage of overall student satisfaction with education at public schools, 2011 to 2015

Source: ACT Education Directorate

YEAR 12 CERTIFICATION

Year 12 certification is the number of students who meet the requirements of an ACT Senior Secondary Certificate, expressed as a percentage of year 12 enrolments. Data is obtained from the ACT Board of Senior Secondary Studies and the ACT School Census undertaken in February each year. Estimates are calculated based on the number of students completing the requirements of the ACT Senior Secondary Certificate divided by the number of year 12 students as at the ACT School Census in February each year.

Further information on this measure can be obtained by emailing ETDAnnualReport@act.gov.au.

The ACT Public School certification rate for year 12 has been stable around 88 percent over the last five years (Figure B2.18).

FIGURE B2.18: PERCENTAGE OF YEAR 12 PUBLIC SCHOOL STUDENTS WHO RECEIVED AN ACT SENIOR SECONDARY CERTIFICATE, 2011 TO 2015

Figure showing percentage of year 12 public school students who received an ACT Senior Secondary Certificate, 2011 to 2015

Source: ACT Education Directorate

ABORIGINAL AND TORRES STRAIT ISLANDER YEAR 12 CERTIFICATION RATE

The certification rate for year 12 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students in public schools increased from 80.4 percent in 2011 to 86.2 percent in 2012. The rate dropped for 2013 to 2015 against the target of 80 percent. In February 2015 there were 102 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students enrolled in year 12 at public colleges. Of these, 71 students or 69.6 percent graduated with an ACT Senior Secondary Certificate, less than the target of 80 percent or 82 students (Figure B2.19). The 2015 result is an improvement of more than 10 percentage points from 2014.

FIGURE B2.19: PERCENTAGE OF YEAR 12 ABORIGINAL AND TORRES STRAIT ISLANDER PUBLIC SCHOOL STUDENTS WHO RECEIVED AN ACT SENIOR SECONDARY CERTIFICATE, 2011 TO 2015

Figure showing percentage of year 12 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander public school students who received an ACT Senior Secondary Certificate, 2011 to 2015

Source: ACT Education Directorate

YEAR 12 GRADUATES STUDYING OR EMPLOYED SIX MONTHS AFTER COMPLETING YEAR 12

ACT destination data are based on a survey of graduates who successfully complete an ACT Senior Secondary Certificate. Graduates from the previous year are surveyed in May of the reference year. The survey frame is drawn from the ACT Board of Senior Secondary Studies administrative records.

The Australian rate is for 15-24 year-olds engaged in full-time or part-time study or employment in May of the reference year after finishing year 12 the previous year. This is a new time series and not comparable with data reported in the previous annual reports.

Further information on this measure can be obtained by emailing ETDAnnualReport@act.gov.au.

The percentage of public school year 12 graduates engaged in study or employment six months after completing year 12 has been stable at around 90 percent over the last five years. This is a relatively higher percentage than the Australian percentage for 2014 and 2015 (Figure B2.20). The comparable Australian data is available for these two years.

The Directorate continues to develop programs and provides high quality teaching and learning facilities and opportunities to ensure that students are employed and/or studying after leaving school.

FIGURE B2.20: PERCENTAGE OF PUBLIC SCHOOL YEAR 12 GRADUATES STUDYING OR EMPLOYED SIX MONTHS AFTER COMPLETING YEAR 12, 2011 TO 2015

Figure showing percentage of public school year 12 graduates studying or employed six months after completing year 12, 2011 to 2015

Source: ACT Education Directorate and Australian Bureau of Statistics, Survey of Education and Work 6227.0, 2014 and 2015

VOCATIONAL EDUCATION AND TRAINING GRADUATES WITH IMPROVED EMPLOYMENT STATUS AFTER TRAINING

Proportion of graduates with improved employment status is defined as graduates aged 20-64 years with an improved employment status after training divided by the total graduates aged 20-64 years. The data are derived from the annual Student Outcomes Survey of the National Centre for Vocational Education Research. The annual survey seeks to measure apprentices’ and vocational education and training students’ satisfaction with training and post-training employment outcomes.

Further information on this measure can be obtained from www.ncver.edu.au external link.

Over the five year period from 2011 to 2015, the proportion of vocational education and training graduates with improved employment status after training remained above the national results. In 2015, the proportion of graduates with improved employment status after training was 64 percent slightly below the ACT target (Figure B2.21).

FIGURE B2.21: PROPORTION OF GRADUATES WITH IMPROVED EMPLOYMENT STATUS AFTER TRAINING, 2011 TO 2015

Figure showing proportion of graduates with improved employment status after training, 2011 to 2015

Source: ACT Education Directorate and National Centre for Vocational Education Research, Student Outcomes Survey 2015

ABORIGINAL AND TORRES STRAIT ISLANDER LITERACY

The performance of year 5 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander public school students in reading is shown by the mean achievement score in NAPLAN. Figure B2.22 shows that the mean achievement score of 448 for year 5 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander public school students was substantially above the national mean score of 425.

FIGURE B2.22: MEAN ACHIEVEMENT SCORE OF ABORIGINAL AND TORRES STRAIT ISLANDER YEAR 5 PUBLIC SCHOOL STUDENTS, IN READING, 2011 TO 2015

Figure showing mean achievement score of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander year 5 public school students, in reading, 2011 to 2015

Source: ACT Education Directorate and Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority, National Assessment Program – Literacy and Numeracy 2011 to 2015

The performance of year 9 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander public school students in reading is shown by the NAPLAN mean achievement score. Figure B2.23 shows an increasing trend of mean achievement scores for the ACT in reading from 2012 to 2015 and consistently higher than the national mean. The gap between the target and actual scores also declined gradually over the last three years. The Directorate continues to work towards achievement of the target, particularly through targeted programs to assist Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students.

FIGURE B2.23: MEAN ACHIEVEMENT SCORE OF ABORIGINAL AND TORRES STRAIT ISLANDER YEAR 9 PUBLIC SCHOOL STUDENTS, IN READING, 2011 TO 2015

Figure showing mean achievement score of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander year 9 public school students, in reading, 2011 to 2015

Source: ACT Education Directorate and Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority, National Assessment Program – Literacy and Numeracy 2011 to 2015

ABORIGINAL AND TORRES STRAIT ISLANDER NUMERACY

The performance of year 5 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander public school students in numeracy is shown by the NAPLAN mean achievement score. Figure B2.24 shows that ACT mean scores for year 5 numeracy for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students from 2011 to 2015 were consistently above the national mean scores for year 5 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students.

FIGURE B2.24: MEAN ACHIEVEMENT SCORE OF ABORIGINAL AND TORRES STRAIT ISLANDER YEAR 5 PUBLIC SCHOOL STUDENTS, IN NUMERACY, 2011 TO 2015

Figure showing mean achievement score of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander year 5 public school students, in numeracy, 2011 to 2015

Source: ACT Education Directorate and Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority, National Assessment Program – Literacy and Numeracy 2011 to 2015

The performance of year 9 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander public school students in numeracy is shown by the NAPLAN mean achievement score. Figure B2.25 shows that the numeracy mean achievement scores for year 9 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students in the ACT were consistently above the numeracy mean achievement scores for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students across Australia.

FIGURE B2.25: MEAN ACHIEVEMENT SCORE OF ABORIGINAL AND TORRES STRAIT ISLANDER YEAR 9 PUBLIC SCHOOL STUDENTS, IN NUMERACY, 2011 TO 2015

Figure showing mean achievement score of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander year 9 public school students, in numeracy, 2011 to 2015

Source: ACT Education Directorate and Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority, National Assessment Program – Literacy and Numeracy, 2011 to 2015

INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION

The number of international students is the headcount of students who are non-citizen or non-permanent residents of Australia. The data reported is per calendar year. There are two main categories of international students: students on a School Sector Student Visa Subclass 500 and students who are the dependants of temporary residents whose parents are on various visa subclasses either working or studying in the ACT.

Students on a School Sector Student Visa Subclass 500 are those who choose to enrol offshore and pay tuition fees after receiving marketing information about the benefits of studying in ACT Public Schools. Dependent children of temporary residents are those who enrol onshore as their parents are the principal visa holders. The payment of tuition fees for the dependants of temporary residents is dependent on their parents visa subclass. 75 percent of dependants of temporary residents are exempt from paying tuition fees in ACT Public Schools.

Further information on this measure can be obtained by emailing ETDAnnualReport@act.gov.au

Over the past four years, there has been steady growth in the numbers of students on a School Sector Student Visa Subclass 500 with a 20 percent increase in student numbers between 2014 and 2015 (Figure B2.26). Similar growth is expected over 2016 as parents are electing to send their children to the ACT as a high performing education jurisdiction and for the ACT’s reputation offshore as a safe study destination. The numbers of both fee exempt and fee paying students studying in ACT Public Schools as dependants on their parents visa has remained largely static over the past five years.

FIGURE B2.26: FULL FEE PAYING AND FEE-EXEMPT INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS IN PUBLIC SCHOOLS, 2011 TO 2015

Figure showing full fee paying and fee-exempt international students in public schools, 2011 to 2015

Source: ACT Education Directorate

ATTENDANCE

The student attendance rate is the number of actual full-time equivalent student-days attended by full-time students in years 1 to 10 as a percentage of the total number of possible student-days over the period.

A data quality statement on this measure can be obtained from the ‘Report on Government Services’ page of the Australian Productivity Commission website at http://www.pc.gov.au/research/ongoing/report-on-government-services external link.

The attendance rate of students in ACT Public Schools has been above 91 percent over the last five years. The attendance rate exceeded 92 percent for 2013 (Figure B2.27).

FIGURE B2.27: ATTENDANCE RATE OF PUBLIC SCHOOL STUDENTS IN YEAR 1 TO 10, 2011 TO 2015

Figure showing attendance rate of public school students in year 1 to 10, 2011 to 2015

Source: ACT Education Directorate

CONNECTING WITH FAMILIES AND THE COMMUNITY

We will partner with families and engage with the community to build meaningful relationships.

The percentage of year 10 students who proceed to public secondary college education reports the total number of year 10 students in public high schools, as at the August census, who enrolled in year 11 at public colleges as at February census in the following year.

Further information on this measure can be obtained by emailing ETDAnnualReport@act.gov.au.

An indicator of stakeholder confidence in public education is the retention of year 10 students in public schools to year 11 in public colleges. The percentage of year 10 students who proceeded to public secondary education increased over the last five years. The percentage of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students who proceeded to public secondary education also increased over the last five years (Figure B2.28).

FIGURE B2.28: PERCENTAGE OF YEAR 10 STUDENTS WHO PROCEED TO PUBLIC SECONDARY COLLEGE EDUCATION

Figure showing percentage of year 10 students who proceed to public secondary college education

Source: ACT Education Directorate

PARENT AND CARER SATISFACTION WITH EDUCATION PROVIDED AT PUBLIC SCHOOLS

Parent and carer satisfaction is based on a survey in August each year of parents and carers of students attending public schools. In determining overall parent and carer satisfaction, the question ‘overall I am satisfied with my child’s education at the school’ is used. Responses are collected on a five point scale with only statements of ‘agree’ or ‘strongly agree’ being used to calculate overall satisfaction rates.

Further information on this measure can be obtained by emailing ETDAnnualReport@act.gov.au.

Figure B2.29 indicates that there was a high level of parent and carer satisfaction with the education provided at public schools over the last five years. The level of overall satisfaction is on the rise over the last five year from 83 percent in 2011 to 87 percent in 2015, but was just below the target of 88 percent.

FIGURE B2.29: PERCENTAGE OF OVERALL SATISFACTION OF PARENTS AND CARER WITH THE EDUCATION PROVIDED AT PUBLIC SCHOOLS, 2011 TO 2015

Figure showing percentage of overall satisfaction of parents and carer with the education provided at public schools, 2011 to 2015

Source: ACT Education Directorate

BUSINESS INNOVATION AND IMPROVEMENT

We will support innovation, improve our business systems and be open and accountable for our decisions.

FREEDOM OF INFORMATION (FOI)

The number of FOI requests is the total number of requests received by the Directorate in a financial year under section 79(2) of the Freedom of Information Act 1989 (ACT).

Further information on this measure can be obtained by emailing ETDAnnualReport@act.gov.au.

The Directorate, in line with ACT Government policy, is committed to making government decisions transparent through Open Government initiatives. The Freedom of Information (FOI) process is a mechanism allowing the community to access information held by the Directorate. The number of new FOI requests in a financial year increased from 38 in 2011-12 to 44 in 2015-16 (Figure B2.30).

FIGURE B2:30: NUMBER OF NEW FOI REQUESTS, 2011-12 TO 2015-16

Figure showing number of new FOI requests, 2011-12 to 2015-16

Source: ACT Education Directorate

For further information contact:
Director
Planning and Analytics
(02) 6207 6197

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