Years 5 – 6
Lesson 3: Neighbourly Connections

Everyone, Everyday Program logo

Contents

1. Lesson Overview
2. Australian Curriculum Links
3. Lesson Plan: Suggested sequence of learning experiences

Downloadable reference materials

Lesson 3 Activity 1 [PDF 89KB] [Word 73KB]
Lesson 3 Activity 1 Poster [PDF 175KB] [Word 1.5MB]
Lesson 3 Neighbourly Connections [PDF 164KB] [Word 194KB]


1. Lesson Overview

Length of Lesson

80 minutes

Prior knowledge (what should the teacher have already covered)

  • Introduction to the Everyone Everyday program.

Resources Required

  • Action Plan Poster
  • Display board
  • Student exercise books for Everyone, Everyday program
  • Handout or electronic whiteboard projection of – ‘Our School Community’ graphic outline

Key Concepts

  • An inclusive community is the type of community that we strive for so that everyone, everyday has opportunities to participate in community life.
  • Inclusive communities foster positive attitudes and opinions from community members that are respectful and welcoming to those who may experience challenges with everyday living.
  • Inclusive communities give everyone equal opportunities to achieve their ambitions.

Learning Outcomes

LO1:Students can describe the elements of a school community.
LO2:Students can describe the elements of a local community.
LO3:Students can describe what makes a community inclusive.

Top


2. Australian Curriculum Links

HPE Subject Area Years 5 and 6

ACPPS060: Identify how valuing diversity positively influences the wellbeing of the community

Yr 5 Humanities and Social Sciences Subject Area (Civics and Citizenship sub strand)

ACHASSK118: How people with shared beliefs and values work together to achieve a civic goal

General Capabilities

By the end of year 6 (level 4)

EU: Ethical Understanding, IU: Intercultural Understanding, L: Literacy

EU: Consider consequences: evaluate the consequences of action in familiar and hypothetical scenarios.
EU: Reflect on ethical action: articulate a range of ethical responses to situations in various social contexts.
EU: Examine values: examine values accepted and enacted within various communities.
IU: Empathise with others: imagine and describe the situations of others in local, national and global contexts.
L: Navigate, read and view learning area texts: navigate, read and view subject-specific texts with some challenging features and a range of graphic representations.

Assessable moments: As students undertake the learning experiences described in the lesson, take note of a range of assessable moments to provide information about student achievement. Ongoing assessment will provide evidence of the extent to which students achieve the identified Australian Curriculum links. Assessable moments are linked to learning outcomes and are identified by the following identifier:

Assessable Outcome TickLO (insert number)

Top


3. Lesson Plan: Suggested sequence of learning experiences

Format Lesson Plan: Suggested sequence of learning experiences

Intro
2 mins

State the learning intention: Today we are going to begin a unit of work called Everyone, Everyday. In this unit, we will be learning about what an inclusive community is, and what we can all do to make sure everyone has the opportunity to be included in community life, everyday. We will explore the issues faced by people who may experience barriers to being included in their community – particularly those with disability.

Firstly, let’s take a look at who lives in our community.


Body
70 mins

Activity 1: Our community – every contact counts!

Resources: Lesson 3 Activity 1 [PDF] [Word Doc]

Teacher’s notes: To develop students understanding of community, there are three parts to this activity. Part one – what makes a school community? Part two – what makes a local community? Part three – what makes an inclusive community? The main point to keep on emphasizing is ‘every contact counts’.

Part 1: In this activity, we are going to develop our understanding of what a community is. There are many different types of communities.

Class discussion: What do you think a community is? (a group of people who share a common interest, or a group of people who live, work and play in the same area). What is an example of a community? (school, sporting, cultural, local, global, art, music, religious, etc)

The type of community we will be talking about is a community that consists of people, places and systems (or the way communities do things). We are going to look at our school community first.

Refer to handout – ‘Our School Community’ (Graphic outline concentric circles): There are many different people who belong to our school community.

Explain the parts to the diagram: Go through each concentric circle filling in the missing words from the list provided, making the point that as the circles get bigger, these people have less contact with you every day, but are still a part of the school community. Explain that the outer circle includes the places that all these people may use or have access to.

Focus questions:

  • CENTRE CIRCLE: Who do you have the most contact with in your school community?
  • SECOND CIRCLE: Who you have some contact with?
  • THIRD CIRCLE: Who do you have the least contact with?
  • OUTER CIRCLE: What spaces do we share in our school?

Assessable Outcome TickLO1 Class discussion: How would you describe a school community? A school community consists of a group of people who share and contribute to the school for a range of reasons.

Main point to highlight:

  • Our school community is made up of many people who contribute to our school and share our school resources for different reasons.

Part two: What makes a local community? Use explicit teaching and think out loud: “A local community consists of people, places and systems”.

Ask students to draw diagram with 2 concentric circles. Explain that the inner circle represents ‘people’, and the second circle represents ‘places and systems’).

Focus questions:

  • What things can be different about people who live in a community? Record in inner circle. (Make sure skills and abilities is included)
  • What places do people share in a community? Record in second circle.
  • What systems do people live by in a community? (ie systems government put in place for the community to use like transport, law and justice, health care and school). Record in second circle.

A diagram showing examples of Local Community's relationship between Place and Systems, and People.

Assessable Outcome TickLO2 Class discussion: How would you describe a local community? Record on worksheet. A local community consists of groups of people with different backgrounds and experiences who share and contribute to their local community. The local community has systems that support its community members.

Main point to highlight:

  • Local communities are places where different people share an environment where they work, learn and play.

Part three: We are now going to take a look at what an INCLUSIVE community is. That is, one where there are opportunities for everyone to participate in community life, no matter what their differences are. Teacher’s notes: you will need to ‘unpack’ the word inclusive – ‘to include, all-encompassing, wide-ranging, opposite to exclusive’. This lesson is just an introduction to inclusive communities. Throughout the Everyone, Everyday program, we will be exploring elements of an inclusive community, and work towards taking action to make our local community more inclusive.

Optional extension question: Can you think of an example where people have been excluded in their community?

Teacher’s notes: there are many examples of exclusion in the community that you may wish to discuss with the students if you feel comfortable doing so (examples – racism, sexism, ageism, ableism - feeling superior to someone else and having social prejudice because they have a disability).

Group work - responding to a scenario:Organise students to work in small groups of 3 or 4 to generate ideas about how the following situations can be inclusive or exclusive, depending on how the community responds to them. Give each group 1 scenario to respond to.

Teacher’s notes: As you are brainstorming ideas, make the point that inclusive local communities do not just provide access to buildings (eg ramps and rails) and assistive technology to people with physical and learning challenges (eg. remote control technology). Inclusive communities also foster positive attitudes and opinions from community members that are respectful and welcoming to those who may experience challenges with everyday living (ie – focus on the PEOPLE element as well as the PLACES element).

Go through example:

1. Jim, who is 75 years old, would like to use public buses for transport. Jim has hearing difficulties and uses a walking frame. How would at inclusive community respond to his needs so Jim is able to catch the bus, and has a positive experience? (Optional – How would an exclusive community respond?)

Response from an Inclusive Community

Teacher’s notes: discuss this response from an Exclusive Community to highlight the difference. This is optional for students to complete.

  • bus drivers and other bus users would be welcoming to Jim, respectful and show understanding of his needs
  • buses would have clear, audible announcement systems and highly visible trip information displays with times and destinations (eg digital display)
  • stop buttons would be easy to reach
  • there would be no trip hazards at bus stops, and hand rails near seating
  • there would be lower entry level on buses at doorways for easy access
  • bus stops would be linked to other forms of transport (ie integrated) to make it easy for Jim to get to multiple destinations.
  • Jim does not feel welcome on the bus. People stay away from him and do not make eye contact or give a welcoming smile (do not engage)
  • Jim finds it difficult to use buses and bus stops as they are not user friendly (accessible) for people with hearing difficulties or mobility challenges. The audio system is not clear, and there are limited visual displays of information.

2. Jenny is a young mother who uses a pram to transport her baby. How would an inclusive community make the environment easy for Jenny to get to where she needs to go, and also have a positive experience? (Optional – how would an exclusive community respond?)

(Example answer – wide aisles and doorways in shops and public buildings, good system of pathways, pram parking spaces, storage facilities for prams in buildings, access to change tables, pedestrian lights at roads that allow enough time for prams to cross. Most importantly, people would be welcoming (friendly), respectful and show understanding of the needs of people using prams).

3. Sarina is 18 years old and uses a wheelchair. She can communicate well, but doesn’t communicate verbally (ie does not speak). Sarina has a support person to assist her throughout the day. Like everyone, Sarina enjoys social contact and being with friends. How could people that come into contact with Sarina make her feel included? (Optional – how would an exclusive community respond?)

(Example answer – people who come into contact with Sarina would engage with her, and not just turn away. They could find out how she prefers to communicate. For example, Sarina may like to use assistive technology like an electronic communication system that is interactive. During interactions, people would communicate with Sarina, not just the support worker, and get to know Sarina by taking an interest, like you would do with any person you meet for the first time).

4. Samuel is 24 years old and has vision impairment. He prefers to use a cane to assist him move around the environment. Samuel works in the city and likes to take a walk around the city park during his lunch breaks. How would at inclusive community respond to his needs so it is easy for him to access the city, and have a positive experience? (Optional – how would an exclusive community respond?)

(Example answer – The city infrastructure would have features that make it easy for people with a vision impairment to move around (eg. textured raised dots/ tactile paving features on pathways, Braille on signage and lift buttons etc, audible signalling at pedestrian crossings to indicate go and stop). Most importantly, people would be friendly, engage with Samuel, and not make assumptions about his abilities).

5. Penny is 10 years old. She enjoys music and would like to join the local community kid’s band. Her intellectual disability makes it hard for her to learn an instrument and read music. How would an inclusive community respond to Penny’s ambition so that she can be a part of the group and have positive experiences? (Optional – how would an exclusive community respond?)

(Example answer – The band would provide an opportunity for Penny to join the group and make her feel welcome by engaging with, and getting to know her. The band teachers and members would find out Penny’s strengths and abilities, and discuss with Penny what valuable role she can play to contribute to the group (eg help with sound, organise set up and pack up, administrative duties). Penny could be introduced to a range of ways to make music without using complex instruments. Penny would be acknowledged for her contributions to the group).

Class discussion: Groups report their ideas in response to the scenarios.

Refer to table to consolidate ideas.

Features of an
Inclusive Community

Features of an
Exclusive Community

  • People take notice of others who are different to them, and don’t turn away.
  • All people, regardless of any difference, have the same opportunities to take part in all aspects of community life
  • Spaces are designed so that everyone has access (accessibility – eg wheelchair access in buildings and public spaces)
  • People use respectful language when talking about people who are different to them
  • All people, regardless of any difference, have a sense of belonging and respect in the community
  • All people are acknowledged for the contributions they make
  • People are discriminated against based on difference
  • People are disrespectful to those who are different
  • Buildings are not designed so that they are accessible for people with a physical challenge
  • People are unable to participate in activities because they do not cater for the needs of community members
  • People do not feel welcomed or encouraged to join in to community activities
  • People do not feel a sense of freedom, choice or control
  • People are ignored

Poster display (optional): You may display the list of features of an inclusive community as a poster in your classroom. (Sample poster attached).

Lesson 3 Activity 1 Poster [PDF 175KB] [Word 1.5MB]

5

Actvity 2: Who benefits?

Assessable Outcome TickLO3 Class discussion: Who benefits from living in an inclusive community? Why do you think so?

(Everyone benefits from living in an inclusive community (better connected, better relationships, more opportunities to make friends, safer environment, better communication, feeling of community spirit and belonging, everyone is given the opportunity to conribute).

Main points to highlight:

  • An inclusive community is the type of community that we strive for so that everyone, everyday has opportunities to participate in community life.
  • Throughout the Everyone, Everyday program, we will be exploring elements of an inclusive community, and work towards taking action to make our local community more inclusive.

Conclusion and reflection
10 mins

Assessable Outcome TickLO3 Class discussion:

What did you learn today?
Why is this important?
What questions do you have?

Top

Back to year 5 – 6 Unit of Work – Introductory Information for Teacher’s