Years 5 – 6
Lesson 5: ‘Can do’ culture (Part 2)

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Contents

1. Lesson Overview
2. Australian Curriculum Links
3. Lesson Plan: Suggested sequence of learning experiences

Downloadable reference materials

Lesson 5 Activity 2 [PDF] [Word Doc]
Lesson 5 Teacher's example - Class Asset Bank [PDF] [Word]
Lesson 5 'Can do' Culture (Part 2) [PDF 150KB] [Word 184KB]


1. Lesson Overview

Length of Lesson

55 mins

Prior knowledge (what should the teacher have already covered)

  • Students are familiar with the concept of inclusive communities.

Resources Required

  • Worksheet – class asset bank.
  • Electronic white board to project asset bank worksheet.

Key Concepts

  • Everyone has things they are good at and ways to contribute to the community.
  • We can build strong communities if we take notice of an individual's strengths and abilities, and provide opportunities for people to use these in the things they do every day.
  • If everyone can use their abilities, the whole community is stronger because of the contribution each person is able to make.

Learning Outcomes

LO1: Students recognise the ways people can contribute to their community by focusing on ability.
LO2: Students generate ideas on how everyone can contribute to a stronger community when we focus on ability.

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2. Australian Curriculum Links

HPE Subject Area Years 5 and 6

ACPPS060: Identify how valuing diversity positively influences the wellbeing of the community
ACPPS075: Analyse factors that influence emotions, and develop strategies to demonstrate empathy and sensitivity

General Capabilities

By the end of year 6 (level 4)

PSC: Recognise personal qualities and achievements: describe the influence that personal qualities and strengths have on learning outcomes.
L: Understanding learning area vocabulary: use vocabulary, including subject specific vocabulary from a range of learning areas and vocabulary that expresses shades of meaning.
CCT: Imagine possibilities and connect ideas: combine ideas in a variety of ways and from a range of sources to create new possibilities.

Assessable moments: As students undertake the learning experiences described in the lesson, take note of a range of assessable moments to provide information about student achievement. Ongoing assessment will provide evidence of the extent to which students achieve the identified Australian Curriculum links. Assessable moments are linked to learning outcomes and are identified by the following identifier:

Assessable Outcome TickLO (insert number)

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3. Lesson Plan: Suggested sequence of learning experiences

Format Lesson Plan: Suggested sequence of learning experiences

Intro
15 mins

Homework follow-up: In the previous lesson, students were asked to complete a KWL chart (KNOW, WHAT, LEARNED) to learn more about types of disability. This chart records what they already KNOW, WHAT they need to find out, and what they LEARNED. Have a class discussion about what the students learnt.

Teacher’s notes: If the students were involved in the year 3 and 4 Everyone Everyday program, they would have already participated in activities that revolve around the concept of focusing on ability. This lesson will extend their thinking of this concept.

State the learning intention: Today we are going to look at creating a ‘Can do’ culture that focuses on people’s abilities, or what they can do, as opposed to what they cannot do. We will begin by looking at how focusing on abilities creates opportunities and helps build strong communities. Finally, we will learn about what an asset bank is, with deposits and withdrawals!


Body
20 mins

Show stimulus

to introduce the lesson.

Class discussion: What main message do you take from this video clip?

Teacher’s notes: Read through the following two options that can be used to introduce the concept (focusing on abilities) and decide which option would suit your students.  You may wish to use a combination of option 1 and 2.

Activity 1: ‘Can do’ attitude (Option 1)

Everyone has abilities (talents, skills and gifts) that can be used to benefit the individual and the community.

Have a brief discussion about gifts and skills.

Gifts - Gifts are abilities that we are born with.  We may develop them, but no one has to teach them to us.

Skills - Skills are talents that we have acquired in everyday life such as cooking and fixing things.

Students respond to questions:

1. What are some things you can do that you are proud of?

2. What gifts or skills (or positive qualities) do people say you have?

3. What do you enjoy doing?

4. What do you give to others (or contribute) that makes you feel good? (eg. your friends, family, teacher, team mates)

5.How do you feel when you are able to use your abilities at school or at home - that is doing something you are good at?

6. How do you feel when you are not given the opportunity to do something you are good at?  (eg. when you are never given any responsibility to contribute at home or at school).

Main point to highlight:

  • There are many benefits to the individual and the community when people are able to use their strengths and abilities. For example, they are happier, more confident and feel good about themselves.
  • If people are given the opportunity to use their strengths and abilities to participate in learning, working and playing, we create OPORTUNITIES for participation in community life.
  • It is important that we recognise and value the strengths and abilities of everyone everyday.

Therefore, we can build strong communities if we take notice of an individual's strengths and abilities, and provide opportunities for people to use thee in the things they do every day.


Body
20 mins

Activity 1: ‘Can do’ attitude (Option 2)

Part 1: Every single person has things they are good at and ways to contribute to the community.

For example:

  • If you are good at taking care of animals, you may be given responsibility to feed and care for the animals that the school keeps in their animal husbandry program. How does this make you feel?
  • If you are good at cooking, you may be given the opportunity to make the birthday cake for your friend or family member. How does this make you feel?

Class discussion: How do you feel when you are given the opportunity to do something you are good at or enjoy – when you are able to use your abilities? Let’s look at some more examples.

Go through each scenario and ask students to indicate if they can relate to the example:

  • You have a lovely smile and feel confident meeting new people and would like the opportunity to be a part of the ‘welcoming committee’ when there are visitors to the school.
  • You are good at art and craft and would like the opportunity to contribute to a piece of school artwork to be displayed in the front entrance of the school.
  • You are good at sport and would like the opportunity to be selected in a team, or be asked to help coach a team of younger players.
  • You are good at reading and writing and would like the opportunity to be asked to read a story you wrote to the Kindergarten students, or to the whole school on assembly.
  • You are good at dancing, singing or acting and would like the opportunity to perform at a concert.
  • You have good skills in communication, cooperation and leadership and would like the opportunity to be a leader at school (eg member of the school representative council).
  • You are good at maths and would appreciate the opportunity to be given a responsible job like helping calculate the profits from the school fete, or helping at canteen time collecting money.
  • You are good at public speaking and would like to be given the opportunity to speak on assembly.
  • You are good at including others in activities and would like the opportunity to be an ‘Inclusion Ranger” who takes action to include kids during playtime activities who are alone or not confident to join in without being invited.
  • You are good at inventing and constructing and would like to be given the opportunity to participate in a schools competition with a theme of inventing and constructing.

Sample answers:

  • Happy
  • Confident
  • Feel good about myself (higher self-esteem)
  • Valued
  • Powerful
  • Needed
  • More resilient (able to bounce back from a stressful situation)
  • Well-connected to the people around them
  • Welcomed
  • Appreciated
  • Able to perform better
  • Are engaged (stay focused)
  • Are more likely to achieve goals
  • Less stressed

There are hundreds of examples we could use. Can you give any more examples?

Part 2: Let‘s look at what happens when we fail to recognise the abilities of the people in the community, and how we can all contribute in our own ways.

Class discussion: How do you feel when you are not given the opportunity to do something you are good at? For example, when you are never given any responsibility to contribute at home or at school.

Sample answers:

  • Unvalued
  • Unhappy
  • Left out
  • Frustrated
  • Unappreciated
  • Unconfident
  • Stressed
  • Failure
  • Tired, bored
  • Feel bad about myself

Main points to highlight:

  • There are many benefits to the individual and the community when people are able to use their strengths and abilities. For example, they are happier, more confident and feel good about themselves.
  • If people are given the opportunity to use their abilities to participate in learning, working and playing, we create OPPORTUNITIES for participation in community life.

Therefore, we can build strong communities if we recognise value and use the abilities of the people who live there.


20 mins

Activity 2: Our class ASSET bank

Resources:

Lesson 5 Activity 2 [PDF] [Word Doc]
Teacher's Example – Class Asset Bank

Focus activity: To reinforce the focus on ability to build strong communities, read and discuss the following scenario:

“Think of a carpenter who has lost one leg in an accident years ago. Clearly, he has a physical disability that means he has to do some things in different ways. However, he also has a skill. If we know he has a missing leg, we cannot build our community with that information. If we know he has capacity as a wood worker, that information can literally build our community.‘ (source: Kretzmann and McKnight 2003)

We are now going to identify the abilities (or assets) our class has to contribute to the school community. This is important so that we focus on how we can contribute to a strong community.

Refer to ASSET BANK worksheet and display using electronic whiteboard.

Teacher’s notes: Refer to the teacher‘s example provided to get an idea of the type of responses to expect. The examples provided relate to the school environment only. This links in well with the concept of Multiple Intelligences (Howard Gardner’s work).

Instructions:

  1. Go through each asset (skill or ability) and get students to indicate if they think they have this skill or ability. Tally the responses and record in the ‘DEPOSITS’ column – ie put into the bank account.
  2. Assessable Outcome TickLO1, LO2 PREPARE: Work in pairs to formulate ideas about how each of the assets can be used to contribute to the class/school/home/community. Record ideas in ‘WITHDRAWAL’ column – ie take out of the bank. Try and think of other ASSETS that can be deposited into the bank. Record on worksheet.
  3. Assessable Outcome TickLO1, LO2 SHARE: Discuss responses with whole class.

Main point to highlight:

  • If everyone can use their abilities, the whole community is stronger because of the contribution each person is able to make. Weak communities fail to focus on the abilities of community members, and tend to take more notice of what people cannot do.

Conclusion and reflection
5 mins

Assessable Outcome TickLO1, LO2 Class discussion

What did you learn today?
Why is this important?
What questions do you have?

Our Class Asset Bank (Teacher's copy)

Teacher's example - Class Asset Bank [PDF] [Word]

Go through each asset (skill or ability) and get students to indicate if they think they have this skill or ability. Tally the responses and record in the ‘deposits’ column. Have a discussion about how each of the assets can be used to contribute to the class, school, home or community. Record ideas in ‘withdrawal’ column.

ASSET (Skill or ability)

DEPOSIT
(PUT IN)

WITHDRAWAL
(TAKE OUT)

Visual

  • I enjoy painting, drawing and visualising.
 
  • Make posters for the school representative council to promote school events.

Mathematical

  • I enjoy working with numbers and science.
  • I like working with computers and technology.
 
  • Help with money exchange in the canteen (eg serving students).
  • Operate electronic equipment to complete class projects with my group.
  • Represent my school in a chess competition.

Verbal

  • I enjoy reading, writing and speaking.
 
  • Read stories to younger children at school during the buddy program.
  • Write a letter to the council to voice my concerns.
  • Draft information for the school newsletter.
  • Speak at assembly or represent my school at Rostrum (speaking competitions).

Musical

  • I enjoy making and listening to music.
 
  • Perform in the school band and represent my school, or play at school camps for fun with my class mates.
  • Perform in the school musical or concert.

Interpersonal

  • I enjoy working with others.
  • I like to work as a team with others to achieve a goal.
 
  • Help at school events (eg school fete, gardening working bee, clean up Australia Day).
  • Be a part of a sporting team to represent my school or class.

Intrapersonal

  • I like working with myself
  • I am good at setting goals for myself and sticking at it until I get there
 
  • Gather information about a certain topic and build knowledge in that area to help with an element of a group or class project.
  • Represent the school in individual sports (eg various athletic and swimming events) and individual competitions (eg chess, Maths and English competitions).

Naturalist

  • I enjoy animals, plants, landforms and climate.
 
  • Take a responsible role in the school animal husbandry program (caring for animals, worm farm etc).
  • Draw classmate’s attention to interesting things in nature that they do not notice.

Kinaesthetic

  • I enjoy doing hands–on activities.
 
  • Help make a display at school, help put things together that require you to follow instructions.
  • Assist setting up of equipment in PE or for a science experiment.

Moral

  • I like helping and caring for others.
  • Kind and friendly to others, no matter what their differences are.
 
  • Be an ‘inclusion ranger’ and take action when someone is being treated unfairly or being left out.
  • Be a friend to new kids that come to the school so they do not feel scared and lonely.
  • Be involved in a playtime buddy program with younger kids at school.
  • Offer help (first aid) when someone hurts themselves in the playground or on a school camp.

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