Years 5 – 6
Lesson 9: Identifying the issues

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Contents

1. Lesson Overview
2. Australian Curriculum Links
3. Lesson Plan: Suggested sequence of learning experiences

Downloadable reference materials

Lesson 9 Activity 1 [PDF 118KB] [Word 36KB]
Lesson 9 Identifying the issues [PDF 239KB] [Word 154KB]


1. Lesson Overview

Length of Lesson

55 mins

Prior knowledge (what should the teacher have already covered)

  • Understanding of what is meant by ‘barriers’ when we talk about participation in community life, especially for people with disability.

Resources Required

  • Access to internet and electronic whiteboard.
  • Pre–cut statements for activity 1 – enough for one set each pair.

Key Concepts

  • To identify community issues related to people with disability, a consultation process must occur and include people with disability.

Learning Outcomes

LO1: Students acquire knowledge about consultation processes that are used to identify community issues.
LO2: Students identify elements of planning documents that give direction to improve outcomes for people with disability.

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2. Australian Curriculum Links

HPE Subject Area Years 5 and 6

ACPPS057: Recognise how media and important people in the community influence personal attitudes, beliefs, decisions and behaviours.

Yr 6 Humanities and Social Sciences Subject Area (Civics and Citizenship sub strand)

ACHASSK146: Where ideas for new laws can come from and how they become law

General Capabilities

By the end of year 6 (level 4)

PSC: Personal and social capability CCT: Critical and Creative Thinking EU: Ethical Understanding
L: Literacy

PSC: Contribute to a civil society: identify a community need or problem and consider ways to take action to address it.
EU: Examine values: examine values accepted and enacted within various communities.
L: Navigate, read and view learning area texts: navigate, read and view subject-specific texts with some challenging features and a range of graphic representations.
L: Understanding learning area vocabulary: use vocabulary, including subject specific vocabulary from a range of learning areas and vocabulary that expresses shades of meaning.
CCT: Pose questions: pose questions to clarify and interpret information and probe for causes and consequences.

Assessable moments: As students undertake the learning experiences described in the lesson, take note of a range of assessable moments to provide information about student achievement. Ongoing assessment will provide evidence of the extent to which students achieve the identified Australian Curriculum links. Assessable moments are linked to learning outcomes and are identified by the following identifier:

Assessable Outcome TickLO (insert number)

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3. Lesson Plan: Suggested sequence of learning experiences

FormatLesson Plan: Suggested sequence of learning experiences

Intro
2 mins

State the learning intention: To create inclusive communities, we need to take notice and identify issues that create barriers to participation for people with disability. Today, we are going to investigate some of these issues. We will begin by exploring what the issues are, and find out what is being done.


Body
20 mins

Activity 1: Identifying the issues.

Assessable Outcome TickLO1 Class discussion:

  • How can we identify issues that exist in our community?

Example Answer: Consult with the people. Give people opportunities to tell their story. Gather information through surveys and questionnaires. Look at statistics that are collected about the community (eg census data).

  • (Extension question requiring higher order thinking) What questions could we ask people with disability to identify the issues that concern them the most?

Example Answer: What barriers do you experience that make it difficult for you to participate in daily activities and feel included in community life? What could people do to make it easier for you to participate in community life? What changes or adaptations could be made to the environment that would make it easier for you to move around confidently and safely?

Further information to explicitly explain to students: To identify the issues that people with a disability experience and to develop a plan to take action to address these issues, a public consultation process must take place and include people with disability. A well known saying in the community of people with disability is, ‘nothing about us without us!’. During this consultation period, community members are invited to voice their concerns through a variety of ways including attending public meetings and/or submitting written statements outlining their thoughts and feelings.

Other information is collected through community research projects (surveys, questionnaires and interviews), and statistics are compiled to provide further evidence of the current situation. For example, in an Australian population of a little over 22 million people, about 4 million, or 20%, (or 1 in 5 people), report as having a disability. (Source: Disability expectations: Investigating a better life, a stronger Australia 2011, page 11).

The information collected through public consultation, community studies and gathering statistics is analysed and the issues are identified. Next, a plan is produced that outlines actions to take to make a difference, and finally, the plan is implemented (ie action is taken).

Task: Students work in pairs. Each pair is given the 4 steps – cut out. The task is to put the steps in order. (Cut–out template to photocopy is provided).

4 step public consultation process: 1. Gather information from public consultations, community research projects and collecting statistics; 2. analyse the information and identify the issues; 3. Develop a planning document (or strategy) that outlines actions to make a difference; 4. Implement the strategy (ie take action to do what is outlines in the plan).

25 mins

Activity 2: What is happening in Australia?

In Australia, we have a National Disability Strategy 2010 – 2020 (NDS) that sets out six priority areas for action to improve the lives of people with disability, their families and carers, and to provide leadership for a community-wide shift in attitudes.

Teacher’s notes: The NDS document has an ‘easy read’ version (link below) that should be referred to before they undertake the document study. This will help introduce the strategy in a simplified format using words and pictures.

Websites for document:

NDS Summary documentExternal Link
NDS Easy read versionExternal Link
NDS Fact SheetExternal Link

Document study: Refer to the National Disability Strategy Summary Document and respond to the following questions:

  1. What are the 6 priority areas outlined in the National Disability Strategy?
  2. What is the Outcome for each priority area?
  3. Choose one priority area. Read through the areas for action. Give your ideas on how you, or your community, can contribute to one or more of these action areas.

Answer to question 1 and 2:

1. Inclusive and accessible communities —There are many barriers that stop people with disability taking part in the community. Sometimes, there are physical barriers that stop people getting into buildings, or getting from place to place. Sometimes, it is people that stop other people from taking part in work or activities. Some people have bad attitudes towards people with disability. Outcome: People with Disability live in accessible and well designed communities with opportunity for full inclusion in social, economic, sporting and cultural life.

2. Rights protection, justice and legislation — this involves developing community understanding that people with disability have rights, and to make sure that the laws are working well for people with disability. Outcome: People with disability have their rights promoted, upheld and protected.

3. Economic security— this involves helping people with disability find jobs, and housing that is safe and affordable. Outcome: People with disability, their families, and carers have economic security, enabling them to plan for the future and exercise choice and control over their lives.

4. Personal and community support— this involves making services more suitable to the needs of people with disability. This includes offering people with disability more information, choice, and control. Outcome: People with disability, their families, and carers have access to a range of supports to assist them to live independently and actively engage in their communities.

5. Learning and skills—this involves creating opportunities for people with disability to get an education that is right for them and to help people with disability continue to learn throughout their lives. Outcome: People with disability achieve their full potential through their participation in an inclusive high quality education system that is responsive to their needs. People with disability have opportunities to continue learning throughout their lives.

6. Health and wellbeing— Good health and well-being is important for everyone. This involves making changes to the health system so that health outcomes for people with disability are as good as health outcomes for the rest of the community, and to ensure they are able to enjoy long, healthy, and productive lives. Outcome: People with disability attain highest possible health and wellbeing throughout their lives.

Additional or homework activity

Extension Activity 3: What is happening in your state or territory?

In each state and territory in Australia, a similar plan is formulated that links directly to the National Disability Strategy. These plans guide the work that will be undertaken in each state or territory to support the priority areas outlined in the national strategy.

Research: Find the plan from your state or territory that links to the National Disability Strategy. Report back to the class.

Answer (in 2015):

  • ACT: INVOLVE Canberra Disability Commitment 2015 – 2017External Link
  • Victoria: Victorian State Disability Plan 2013 – 2016
  • Queensland: Queensland Disability Plan – 2014 – 2019
  • NSW: NSW Implementation Plan being updated in 2015
  • NT: Framing the Future
  • Tasmania: Disability Framework for Action 2013 – 2017, and the Disability Services Strategic Plan 2015-2018
  • SA: Disability Access and Inclusion Plan 2014 - 2018
  • WA: Disability Services Commission Strategic Plan 2011-2015

Conclusion and reflection
8 mins

Assessable Outcome TickLO1, LO2, LO3 Class discussion:

What did you learn today?
Why is this important?
What questions do you have?


Teacher's Notes
 

Lesson 9 cut-outs

4 step public consultation process: 1. Gather information from public consultations, community research projects and collecting statistics; 2. analyse the information and identify the issues; 3. Develop a planning document (or strategy) that outlines actions to make a difference; 4. Implement the strategy (ie take action to do what is outlines in the plan).

4 step public consultation process: 1. Gather information from public consultations, community research projects and collecting statistics; 2. analyse the information and identify the issues; 3. Develop a planning document (or strategy) that outlines actions to make a difference; 4. Implement the strategy (ie take action to do what is outlines in the plan).

4 step public consultation process: 1. Gather information from public consultations, community research projects and collecting statistics; 2. analyse the information and identify the issues; 3. Develop a planning document (or strategy) that outlines actions to make a difference; 4. Implement the strategy (ie take action to do what is outlines in the plan).

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